Explore the Health Professions

Select the Health Profession of interest to learn about the:

  • Overview of the Profession
     
  • Programs/Schools
     
  • Admissions Requirements (Prerequisite Courses)
     
  • Application Process
     
  • Professional Association Information

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Allopathic and Osteopathic

What a Physician does

Physicians treat and prevent human illness, disease and injury. Physicians examine patients, obtain medical histories, and order, perform, and interpret diagnostic tests. They counsel patients on diet, hygiene, and preventive healthcare. There are two types of physicians: MD (Doctor of Medicine) and the DO (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine). The practice of medicine includes prevention and health education, and the use of accepted methods of medical treatment, including pharmaceutical agents and surgical procedures. There are many specialty areas for physicians to pursue with some of the highest demand for physicians going into family practice, internal medicine, and geriatrics.

Osteopathic medicine is a distinctive form of medical care founded on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. Osteopathic physicians can choose any specialty, prescribe drugs, perform surgeries, and practice medicine anywhere in the United States. DOs are trained to use osteopathic manipulative treatment to help diagnose injury and illness, to alleviate pain, and to promote well being. Osteopathic medicine emphasizes helping each person achieve a high level of wellness by focusing on health promotion and disease prevention.

Programs 

There are 125 allopathic medical schools and 30 osteopathic medical schools in the United States, each taking four years to complete. MDs and DOs enter a residency program of three or more years directly after graduation. Licensure is granted at the state level and is contingent upon passage of the three step United States Medical Licensing Examination. In many cases, licensure is also contingent upon certification by a national specialty board.

Admissions Requirements

Typically, MD and DO programs expect a BA or BS with the following undergraduate curriculum:

Number Course UNH Course
1 year Biology with lab BIOL 411-412
1 year Chemistry with lab CHEM 403-404
1 year Physics with lab PHYS 401-402 or PHYS 407-408
1 year Organic Chemistry CHEM 651-654 or CHEM 547-550
1 semester Biochemistry BMCB 658/659
1 year English  
1 semester Psychology  
1 semester Sociology  
1 semester* Math - Calculus MATH 424A, 424B, or 425
1 semester Math - Statistics BIOL 528, SOC 502, PSYC 402
1 semester Health Professions Seminar INCO 403 (2cr)

*A very small number require 2 semesters of Calculus

An applicant’s undergraduate major is not a factor in medical school admission, so students may complete these prerequisites as major requirements, general education requirements, or as electives.

All MD and DO programs require that applicants take the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). Most programs will also expect applicants to have had significant exposure to the field of medicine, a record of service to the community, and research experience. DO programs prefer applicants to also have exposure to osteopathic medicine through shadowing or clinical experience.

Application Process 

The application process for UNH students applying to medical programs begins a full two years before matriculation. Therefore, a student who wishes to begin a program the fall semester after graduation from UNH needs to contact the Pre-Professional Health Programs Advising office no later than September of their junior year to begin the process. For details of the application cycle see: Application Process.

Further Information 

Valuable sources of information are the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), The American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS), and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM). 

Sources: Most of the information on this page was taken from AAMC and AACOM literature.

What is a Doctor of Dental Medicine/Surgery?

Dentists are concerned with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of problems associated with the hard and soft tissue of the mouth. They examine teeth, mouth, and associated tissues, diagnose and treat diseases, restore defective teeth and tissue, and replace missing teeth. Most dental students enter a practice after receiving their professional degree, either a Doctor of Dental Medicine (D.M.D.) or a Doctor of Dental Surgery (D.D.S.). The two degrees are equivalent in terms of the program completed and the rights conferred to practice. Most dentists are self-employed and establish a private practice alone or in partnership with other dentists. Employment opportunities also exist in the public health service, as teachers and researchers in dental education, commissioned officers in the armed services and researchers or practitioners in industry. Also, some dentists enter advanced education programs for training in a dental specialty.

Programs 

The D.M.D. / D.D.S. dental school curriculum requires at least 11 academic semesters over four calendar years. The curriculum initially emphasizes the basic sciences with an expanding emphasis on the clinical sciences. The student's knowledge and familiarity with the basic sciences are reinforced with applied courses in each discipline.  Dental specialties require additional training after the D.D.S. or D.M.D.

Admissions Requirements

Typically, programs expect a BA or BS with the following undergraduate curriculum:

Number Course UNH Course
1 year Biology with lab BIOL 411-412
1 year Chemistry with lab CHEM 403-404
1 year Physics with lab PHYS 401-402 or PHYS 407-408
1 year Organic Chemistry

CHEM 651-654 or CHEM 547-550

1 semester Biochemistry BMCB 658/659
1 year English  
1 semester Math - Calculus

MATH 424A, 424B, or 425

1 semester Math - Statistics

BIOL 528, SOC 502, PSYC 402

1 semester Health Professions Seminar

INCO 403 (2 cr)

An applicant’s undergraduate major is not a factor in dental school admission, so students may complete these prerequisites as major requirements, discovery requirements, or as electives.  Admissions requirements do vary somewhat from school to school, so students should consult the Official Guide to Dental Schools directory, at www.adea.org/, to determine the specific requirements of the programs that they are interested in.

Observing in the office of a general dentist is the best way to learn about dentistry, and the Student Admissions and Recruitment Committee of the America Dental Education Association (ADEA) recommends that applicants make arrangements to observe in the offices of one or more general dentists. While observing in a dentist's office is not always a requirement for admission, it is seen by the admissions committee as one measure of an applicant's interest in dentistry as a career.

All dental programs require that applicants take the Dental Admission Test (DAT).  All applicants for admission must have taken the DAT within three years of application.

Application Process 

The application process for UNH students applying to dental programs begins a full two years before matriculation.  Therefore, a student who wishes to begin a program the fall after graduation from UNH should contact the Pre-Professional Health Programs Advising Office no later than September of their junior year to begin the process. For details of the application cycle, see Application Process.

Further Information 

A valuable source of information is the American Dental Education Association (ADEA). Contact them at:

American Dental Education Association
1625 Massachusetts Avenue, NW,
Suite 600
Washington, DC 20036-2212
Tel: 202-667-9433
Fax: 202-667-0642
www.ADEA.org.

 

Additional Information:

 

Sources: Most of the information on this page was taken from ADEA literature.

What is a Physician Assistant?

Physician Assistants are health professionals licensed to practice medicine with physician supervision.  PAs work everywhere, from remote rural settings to major urban centers, in doctors’ offices, hospitals, clinics, HMOs, the armed forces, and other federal government agencies.  Some of the many functions performed by PAs include:

  • Taking medical histories
  • Performing physical exams
  • Ordering laboratory tests
  • Diagnosing illnesses
  • Counseling patients
  • Assisting in surgery
  • Prescribing and/or dispensing medication

Most PAs work in primary care (family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, and ob/gyn), but PAs can work in all specialties, including surgery, psychiatry, emergency medicine, and orthopedics. 

How Do I Become a PA?

Graduation from an accredited PA program makes candidates eligible to take the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA) certifying examination. Those who pass the exam can use the title “Physician Assistant - Certified (PA-C).”

Programs

The typical PA program takes 2 years to complete. The first year is composed of classroom studies; during the second year, students perform clinical rotations. 

All PA programs award some sort of credential upon completion.

Admissions Requirements

Admissions requirements vary widely from school to school, but generally master’s degree and certificate-level PA programs expect a BA or BS with the following undergraduate curriculum:

Number Course UNH Course
1 year Anatomy and Physiology BMS 507-508 (preferred)

1 year

Biology with lab BIOL 411-412

1 year

Chemistry with lab CHEM 403-404

1 year

English  
1 year Psychology/Sociology PSYC 401 and SOC 400 recommended
1-2 semesters Math (Statistics and College Level Algebra)  

Many programs also require one semester of organic chemistry, microbiology, biochemistry, and/or genetics.

 

An applicant’s undergraduate major is not a factor in admission, so students may complete these prerequisites as major requirements, general education requirements, or as electives.  Many PA programs expect applicants to have had significant direct patient contact experience.  Expectations range from 500 to 2,000 hours of experience. Experiences might include becoming trained as an LNA/CNA, EMT, phlebotomist, and medical assistant.  The typical applicant already has a bachelor's degree and approximately 4 years of health care experience. Students should consult the Physician Assistants Education Association website to research the specific requirements of the programs they are interested in and utilize the Program Directory.

Many PA programs require the GRE exam. The MCAT is not required. The central application service for the majority of PA programs is CASPA (www.caspaonline.org). Processing of applications usually begins in April with deadlines between October and February. Applicants are advised to apply early.

Further Information

The most current information on PA programs is available from the Physician Assistants Education Association (PAEA), the unifying professional association for PAs.

Contact the PAEA at:

PAEA
300 N. Washington Street
Suite 505
Alexandria, VA 22314-2544
Phone: 703/548-5538
Fax: 703/548-5539
web: paeaonline.org
Email: info@PAEAonline.org

Additional Information

Sources: Most of the information on this page was taken from AAPA literature.

What is a Physical Therapist?

Physical therapists, or PTs, are health care professionals who evaluate and treat people with health problems resulting from injury or disease.  PTs assess joint motion, muscle strength and endurance, function of heart and lungs, and performance of activities required in daily living, among other responsibilities. Treatment includes therapeutic exercise, cardiovascular endurance training, and training in activities of daily living. 

Physical therapists may now choose to become certified as clinical specialists in one of seven specialty areas: cardiopulmonary, clinical electrophysiology, geriatrics, neurology, orthopedics, pediatrics, and sports physical therapy.  A physical therapist may be eligible for specialty certification only after several years of clinical experience.

How Do I Become a PT?

After graduation from an accredited PT program, candidates must pass a state‑administered national exam for licensure.  Other requirements for physical therapy practice vary from state to state according to physical therapy practice acts or state regulations governing physical therapy.

Programs

Virtually all PT education programs have transitioned to the Doctor of Physical Therapy degree.  To practice as a physical therapist in the US, you must earn a PT degree from a CAPTE-accredited physical therapist education program and pass a state licensure exam. DPT programs typically take three years to complete, depending on the specific requirements of the program.  All programs consist of basic and clinical medical science courses as well as clinical rotations/ internships, and many programs have a research component as well.

Admissions Requirements

Admissions requirements can vary widely from school to school, but generally, DPT programs expect a BA or BS with the following undergraduate curriculum:

Number Course UNH Course
1 year

Anatomy and Physiology with lab

BMS 507-508

1 year

Biology with lab

BIOL 411-412

1 year

Chemistry with lab

CHEM 403-404

1 year

Physics with lab

PHYS 401-402 or PHYS 407-408

1 year

Psychology

Abnormal and Developmental Psychology is often required

1 year

English

 
1 semester

Math - Statistics (or other)

 

Some programs either require or strongly recommend exercise physiology (EXSC 620), computer science, foreign language study, or additional coursework in the humanities or social sciences.  An applicant’s undergraduate major is not a factor in admission so that students may complete these prerequisites as major requirements, general education requirements, or as electives.  Many PT programs expect applicants to have had significant exposure to the profession, either through observation or volunteering. Students should consult the American Physical Therapy Association web page for listings of educational programs, and review individual schools to determine the specific requirements of the programs that they are interested in.

DPT programs usually require the GRE.  The MCAT is not required. Many programs participate in the Physical Therapy Centralized Application Service (PTCAS). Visit the PTCAS directory to view a list of DPT programs and information about their prerequisite courses. For information on programs not participating in PTCAS, applications should be requested directly from the schools themselves. 

Further Information

The most current source of information is the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), the unifying professional association for PTs.  Contact the APTA at:

APTA
1111 North Fairfax Street
Alexandria, VA 22314-1488
Phone: 800- 999-2782
Web: www.apta.org

Additional Resources

Sources: Most of the information in this brochure was taken from APTA literature.

What is a Doctor of Optometry?

A Doctor of Optometry (O.D.) is an independent primary health care provider who examines, diagnoses, treats, and manages diseases and disorders of the entire visual system.  The services rendered by optometrists include: prescribing glasses and contact lenses, rehabilitation of the visually impaired, diagnosis and treatment of ocular disease.  Optometrists can practice in a variety of settings:

  • Solo or group practice
  • Hospitals, clinics, and community health centers
  • Public health
  • Military
  • Government

Within these settings, optometrists engage in primary care practice, or they can specialize in an area such as pediatrics, geriatrics, occupational vision, low-vision services (for the visually impaired), or sports vision.  Optometrists do not perform surgery nor prescribe medication.

Programs

There are currently 20 schools and colleges of optometry in the US (plus two in Canada and one in Puerto Rico) offering an OD degree. The four-year OD curriculum begins with two years of classroom and laboratory work in the basic sciences. The remaining two years are comprised primarily of supervised patient care in hospitals, private practices, and clinics. Upon completion of the program, an OD is qualified to seek appropriate state licensure.

Admissions Requirements

Admissions requirements can vary from school to school. Generally, OD programs expect a BA or BS with an undergraduate curriculum similar to the following:

 

Number Course UNH Course
1 year Biology with lab BIOL 411-412
1 year Chemistry with lab CHEM 403-404
1 year Physics with lab PHYS 401-402 or PHYS 407-408
1 semester Organic Chemistry

CHEM 545/546

1 semester Biochemistry BMCB 658/659
1 semester Microbiology BMS 503
1 year English

ENGL 501, 502, 503

1 semester Psychology

PSYC 401

1 semester Math - Calculus MATH 424A, 424B, or 425
1 semester Math - Statistics BIOL 528, SOC 502, PSYC 402

Some programs require anatomy and physiology, a full year of organic chemistry, or additional coursework in the humanities or social sciences, so plan to check with individual schools of interest. An applicant’s undergraduate major is not a factor in admission so that students may complete these prerequisites as major requirements, general education requirements, or as electives.

Students should consult the Schools and Colleges of Optometry Admissions Requirements directory, found at The Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO), to determine the specific requirements of the programs they are interested in.

Application Process 

OD programs require that applicants take the OAT (Optometry Admission Test), which is offered throughout the year.  OptomCAS is the central application service for OD programs. Programs use a rolling admissions process, and students are advised to apply as early in the process as possible.

Further Information

Valuable sources of information are the American Academy of Optometry (AAO) and The Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO).  Contact them at:

AAO
6110 Executive Boulevard, Suite 506
Rockville, MD 20852
Phone:  301‑984‑1441
Web: www.aaopt.org

ASCO
6110 Executive Boulevard, Suite 510
Rockville, MD 20852
Phone: 301-231‑5944
Web: optometriceducation.org

Additional Resources

 

Sources: Most of the information on this page was taken from ASCO and AAO literature.

What is a Doctor of Pharmacy?

A pharmacist (Pharm.D) is a licensed ‘medication expert’ who provides information regarding medication to consumers and health care professionals.  Pharmacists are concerned with disease state management and safeguarding the public's health in matters relating to medication distribution and use. 

Pharmacist responsibilities include a range of services from dispensing medications to monitoring patient health and progress to maximize their response to the medications. Pharmacists also educate consumers and patients on the use of prescriptions and over-the-counter medications and advise physicians, nurses, and other health professionals on drug decisions. Pharmacists also provide expertise about the composition of drugs, including their chemical, biological, and physical properties, and their manufacture and use.

Programs

The Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree program requires at least 2-years of specific pre-professional (undergraduate) coursework followed by 4-academic years (or 3-calendar years) of professional study. Pharmacy colleges and schools may accept students directly from high school into a pre-pharmacy curriculum followed by a pharmacy curriculum, or directly into a pharmacy curriculum after completion of pre-pharmacy requirements in a college curriculum. The majority of students enter a pharmacy program with 3 or more years of college experience. College graduates who enroll in a pharmacy program must complete the full 4-academic years (or 3-calendar) years of professional study to earn the Pharm.D degree.

Admissions Requirements

The classes required for admission into a pharmacy program vary significantly from one institution to the next. Due to the variations in admission requirements and procedures among the colleges and schools of pharmacy, it is advisable to research individual pharmacy programs.

The pharmacy programs will be pleased to supply details concerning admission procedures and curricula. School-specific information is also available in the AACP publication, "Pharmacy School Admission Requirements" (PSAR). The online version of the PSAR is available for free on the AACP web site.

The following are commonly required pre-pharmacy courses:

Number Course UNH Course
1 year Biology with lab BIOL 411-412
1 year Chemistry with lab

CHEM 403-404

1 year Human Anatomy and Physiology BMS 507-508
1-2 semesters Physics with lab PHYS 401-402
1 semester Microbiology BMS 503
1 year Organic Chemistry with lab

CHEM 651/653-652/654

1 semester Biochemistry BMCB 658/659
1 year English Composition  
1-2 semesters Math - Calculus MATH 424A, 424B, or 425
1 semester Economics  
1 semester Public Speaking  

Many programs also require additional courses in Psychology, Humanities, Economics, Social Sciences

Approximately half of all colleges and schools of pharmacy require Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) scores for admission to their program.

In addition to academic preparation, you should evaluate your qualifications to meet the pharmacy's demands for judgment, dependability, and conscientious performance.

Application Process

The Pharmacy College Application Service, known as PharmCAS, is a service of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Applicants use a single PharmCAS application and one set of materials (e.g., transcripts) to apply to multiple Pharm.D degree programs. The PharmCAS application is available online. AACP lists the institutions that participate in this service. Applicants to programs that do not participate in PharmCAS will apply directly to each institution using the application process and documents recommended by the institution.

Further Information 

A valuable source of information is the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP). Contact them at:

AACP
1426 Prince St.
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: (703) 739-2330
www.aacp.org/Pages/Default.aspx

Additional Resources

 

Sources: Most of the information on this page was taken from AACP literature.

What is a Chiropractor?

Doctors of Chiropractic (DC) are physicians who practice their healing art through drug-free, non-surgical means and give special attention to the physiological and biochemical aspects including structural, spinal, musculoskeletal, neurological, vascular, nutritional, emotional and environmental relationships. Chiropractic does not include pharmaceuticals or incisive surgery.

The practice and procedures which may be employed by Doctors of Chiropractic are based on the academic and clinical training received in and through accredited chiropractic colleges and include, but are not limited to, the use of current diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

Programs 

A standard DC program is usually completed within four years of professional study.  The program generally consists of two years of classroom and laboratory study followed by two years emphasizing community-based clinical services dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of disease. After graduation, a DC must pass the sciences and chiropractic sections of the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners. All states administer a state board exam following the passing of the national exam.  Chiropractic is recognized and regulated in every state, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Canada.

Admissions Requirements

Typically, DC programs expect a BA or BS with the following undergraduate curriculum:

Number Course UNH Course
1 year Biology with lab BIOL 411-412
1 year Chemistry with lab CHEM 403-404
1 year Physics with lab* PHYS 401-402 or PHYS 407-408
1 year Organic Chemistry CHEM 651-654 or CHEM 547-550
1 semester General Biochemistry BMCB 658/659
1 year English  
1 semester Psychology PSYC 401

* The second semester of physics can be completed by taking General Physics II; or by one of the following courses: Biomechanics, math-based Statistics, Kinesiology, or Exercise Physiology. (Second semester does not need a laboratory component as long as the first-semester Physics course included a lab.)

An applicant’s undergraduate major is not a factor in school admission so that students may complete these prerequisites as major requirements, general education requirements, or as electives.  Admissions requirements can vary somewhat from school to school, so students should consult the individual programs to determine the specific requirements of the programs they are interested in. (www.chirocolleges.org)

Most DC programs will also expect applicants to have had exposure to the field of chiropractic and a record of service to the community.

Application Process 

The MCAT is not required.  Since there is no central application service for DC programs, applications should be requested directly from the schools themselves.  Applicants are encouraged to apply one full year before the desired start term.

Further Information 

The most up to date sources of information are the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) and the Association of Chiropractic Colleges (ACC).  Contact them at:

ACA
1701 Clarendon Blvd,
Arlington, VA 22209
Phone 800/986-4636
Fax 703/243-2593
www.acatoday.org

ACC
4424 Montgomery Avenue, Suite 102,
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
www.chirocolleges.org

Additional Information

 

Sources: Most of the information on this page was taken from ACA and ACC literature.

What is a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine?

A doctor of podiatric medicine (DPM) specializes in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of foot disorders, diseases, and injuries. The DPM works closely with other health professionals to treat and control disease. The podiatric medicine field includes treatment of sports injuries, diseases, and the overall health of patients with an emphasis on the foot and ankle.

Programs

The course of instruction leading to the DPM degree is four years in length. The first two years are devoted mainly to classroom instruction and laboratory work in the basic medical sciences, such as anatomy, physiology, microbiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, and pathology. During the third and fourth years, students concentrate on courses in the clinical sciences, gaining experience in college clinics, community clinics, and accredited hospitals. Clinical courses include general diagnosis (history taking, physical examination, clinical laboratory procedures, and diagnostic radiology), therapeutics (pharmacology, physical medicine, orthotics, and prosthetics), surgery, anesthesia, and operative podiatric medicine. After completing the four-year course and receiving the DPM degree, the graduate is eligible to take a state board examination to obtain a license to practice in about one-third of the states; two-thirds require an additional year of postdoctoral work before licensure.

There are eight colleges of podiatric medicine in the United States. All receive accreditation from the Council on Podiatric Medical Education and grant the degree of doctor of podiatric medicine (DPM).

Admission Requirements

Typically, DPM programs expect a BA or BS with the following undergraduate curriculum:

Number Course UNH Course
1 year Biology with lab* BIOL 411-412
1 year Chemistry with lab CHEM 403-404
1 year Physics with lab PHYS 401-402 or PHYS 407-408
1 year Organic Chemistry CHEM 651-654 or CHEM 547-550
1 year English  

*Dr. William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine requires 12 semester hours of Biological sciences

 Admissions requirements can vary somewhat from school to school. Research colleges at the American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine (AACPM) to determine the specific requirements of the programs.

Several factors are considered in admitting students to a college of podiatric medicine. Undergraduates with liberal arts backgrounds, as well as those with science majors, are encouraged to apply. Potential podiatric medical students may be evaluated based on their grade point average (GPA), performance on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) (or in some cases the GRE), extracurricular and community activities, personal interview, and professional potential.

Traditionally the MCAT has been the only standardized test required for admissions to the colleges of podiatric medicine. However, some colleges (Barry University School of Graduate Medical Sciences, California School of Podiatric Medicine, Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, and Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine) have indicated their willingness to accept the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).

Application Process

American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine’s Application Service (AACPMAS), opens the first week of August for FALL admission the following year.

Other requirements for admission include Letters of Recommendation, Official Transcripts from all undergraduate and graduate institutions previously attended, which are to be sent directly to the colleges, as well as personal interviews.

Further Information 

A valuable source of information is the American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine (AACPM) and the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). Contact them at:

APMA
9312 Old Georgetown Road
Bethesda, MD 20814
Phone (800) ASK-APMA
www.apma.org

AACPM
1350 Piccard Drive, Suite 322
Rockville, MD 20850
1-800-922-9266  
www.aacpm.org

Additional Information

 

Sources: Most of the information was taken from AACPM literature.

What is a Naturopathic Physician?

A licensed naturopathic physician - Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine (ND) attends a four‑year graduate-level naturopathic medical school and is educated in all of the same basic sciences as an MD but also studies holistic and nontoxic approaches to therapy with a strong emphasis on disease prevention and optimizing wellness. In addition to a standard medical curriculum, the naturopathic physician is required to complete four years of training in clinical nutrition, acupuncture, homeopathic medicine, botanical medicine, psychology, and counseling (to encourage people to make lifestyle changes in support of their health). Graduates of approved naturopathic colleges take a national board examination called the Naturopathic Physicians Licensing Examination for licensing.

Programs

There are currently five colleges of naturopathic medicine in the U.S.  They are:

for further information on all programs refer to the Association of Accredited Naturopathic Medical Colleges.

Admissions Requirements

Admissions requirements vary from school to school, but generally, ND programs expect a BA or BS with the following undergraduate curriculum:

Number Course UNH Course
1 year Biology with lab BIOL 411-412
1 year Chemistry with lab CHEM 403-404
1 semester Physics with lab PHYS 401
1 year Advanced Chemistry with labs*

CHEM 651-654 or CHEM 547-550 (full-year sequence)
or CHEM 546/547 and BMCB 658/659 (one semester of each)

1 year English  
1 year Psychology  
1 year Humanities  
1 semester Social Sciences  
1 semester Math - Finite or Calculus MATH 420 or MATH 424A, 424B, or 425
1 semester Math - Statistics BIOL 528, SOC 502, PSYC 402

*One year of Organic Chemistry OR one semester of Organic Chemistry and one semester of Biochemistry

An applicant’s undergraduate major is not a factor in admission so that students may complete these prerequisites as major requirements, general education requirements, or as electives.  Since prerequisites vary from school to school, students should be sure to check the specific requirements of each program that they are applying to.

ND programs require neither the MCAT nor GRE. Some, but not all, schools participate in the centralized application service for ND programs, NDCAS. Check directly with the schools regarding the application procedure.

Further Information

A valuable source of information is The Association of Accredited Naturopathic Medical Colleges (AANMC).

AANMC
Assoc. of Accredited Naturopathic Medical Colleges
4435 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite 403
Washington, DC  20016
Phone: 202.237.8150 or 866.538.2267 (toll-free)
Fax: 202.237.8152
info@aanmc.org
 

Additional Information

Explore Health Careers

 

Sources: Most of the information on this page was taken from AANP literature.