Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences

Explore the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences 

The Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences (MCBS) at the University of New Hampshire offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in programs that reflect our strengths in biochemistry and cell biology, genomics, microbiology, and the biomedical sciences. We are also expanding interdisciplinary collaborations within and outside the university to develop new initiatives in the areas of environmental science, computational biology, and translational medicine.

Several MCBS faculty have received awards at both the university and national levels, including awards for excellence in teaching, research, and mentoring.

At the undergraduate level, experiential, hands-on learning is at the core of our teaching mission. In addition to upper-level laboratory courses, many of our students engage in independent research projects under the supervision of a faculty mentor and/or participate in meaningful internships with area employers.

Our graduate programs include 39 faculty representing the following research areas:  host-microbe interactions; genome evolution, environmental genomics and molecular ecology; structural biology and proteomics; environmental microbiology; and signal transduction. Our graduate students are fully supported by teaching and/or research assistantships.

 

  • An Unpaid Internship Pays Off
    Alexia Gianoulis’s love of wildlife and exotic animals began with her childhood pets, a hedgehog and gecko, and led to a recent summer internship at the New England Wildlife Center in South Weymouth, Massachusetts.
    An Unpaid Internship Pays Off
    Alexia Gianoulis’s love of wildlife and exotic animals began with her childhood pets, a hedgehog and gecko, and led to a recent summer internship at the New England Wildlife Center in South Weymouth, Massachusetts.
  • A master's program bestows the right tools for success
    Gabriella Angelini graduated in 2017 with a master’s degree in genetics. She is now a research associate at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
    A master's program bestows the right tools for success
    Gabriella Angelini graduated in 2017 with a master’s degree in genetics. She is now a research associate at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
  • Seeking a Better World Through Science
    Francesca Barucci ’20 is busy. The biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology major from Fairfield, Conn., is also minoring in Italian studies and chemistry and is a member of the UNH Chapter of the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Seeking a Better World Through Science
    Francesca Barucci ’20 is busy. The biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology major from Fairfield, Conn., is also minoring in Italian studies and chemistry and is a member of the UNH Chapter of the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
  • Being the Change She Wants to See
    Born and mainly raised in the Dominican Republic, biomedical science major Walkania Santos ’19 is the second in her family to attend college in the U.S. Her plan to become a doctor is rooted in her experience growing up where access to medical care is limited.  
    Being the Change She Wants to See
    Born and mainly raised in the Dominican Republic, biomedical science major Walkania Santos ’19 is the second in her family to attend college in the U.S. Her plan to become a doctor is rooted in her experience growing up where access to medical care is limited.  
  • Fast Forward
    Enzymes are a complex protein that help speed biochemical reactions. Graeme Lambert ’19, biochemistry major and president of the UNH Chapter of the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, knows all about enzymes — and speed.
    Fast Forward
    Enzymes are a complex protein that help speed biochemical reactions. Graeme Lambert ’19, biochemistry major and president of the UNH Chapter of the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, knows all about enzymes — and speed.

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