Department Research Areas

UNH prides itself in its commitment to Undergraduate and Graduate Student Research. Students in the Department of Agriculture, Nutrition, and Food Systems have the opportunity to work with faculty who are at the top of their fields.

Department Research Opportunities

Animal Science faculty conduct research on a broad range of topics and welcome undergraduates into their labs. The Faculty Directory lists faculty who teach Animal Science courses and their research interests. 

Undergraduates who are interested in gaining hands-on experience should make an appointment to talk with one or more faculty whose research grabs your interest.  A simple “I’m curious about your work, and I might want to try my hand at research – can you tell me more?” is a great place to start.  Once you learn more about ongoing projects, both of you can explore which of the options might be right for you. 

Interested in getting involved in a lab?

Explore UNH’s options for undergraduate research: 

  • Looking for 1 to 4 credits for conducting research during the academic year?  Consider signing up for a ANSC 795 Special Investigations under the supervision of a specific faculty member.
  • For a more defined research experience/project during the academic year, an Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (URA) grant is a positive option.
  • Would you consider getting paid to conduct research over the summer?  A Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) may be for you.
  • Do you love to travel?  SURF-Abroad or an International Research Opportunities Program (IROP) grant is a way to get a research and cultural experience at the same time. 
  • Are you curious and simply want to “dip your toes in” and explore what research is all about, but have not defined a specific area yet? INCO 590 (variable credit), Student Research Experience, is a great place to start.

 

Featured Research Project

Dr. André F. Brito, assistant professor of organic dairy management in the College of Life Sciences and Agriculture at UNH, is the principal investigator on this research project aimed at extending the growing season, increasing the duration of cattle grazing, optimizing nutrient utilization, decreasing nitrogen waste, and boosting the nutritious components that make organic milk a desired product in the marketplace through flaxseed supplementation of winter forage.

 

We encourage our nutrition students to get involved in research – and there are lots of opportunities just waiting for you! Where to start?

First, look at the Faculty page to find out what Nutrition faculty are exploring – anything grab you?

Second, explore UNH’s options:

Third, make an appointment to talk with one or more faculty whose research grabs your interest. A simple “I’m curious about your work, and I might want to try my hand at research – can you tell me more?” is a great place to start. Once you learn more about ongoing projects, the two of you can explore which of the options might be right for you.

What is CHANAS?

The College Health and Nutrition Assessment Survey (CHANAS) is an ongoing project examining the health of traditionally aged college adults (18-24 years old).  CHANAS focuses on diet and lifestyle behaviors and their impact on health status. *CHANAS was previously known as YAHRSI, the Young Adult Health Risk Screening Initiative.

Why is CHANAS important?

The college years are a time of significant transition as young adults move away from parents/caregivers and establish independence. This period of life has been associated with declines in health, including weight gain and sedentary lifestyles. As limited data currently exists, CHANAS hopes to gain a better understanding of the factors associated with the current health of college students.

Learn more about CHANAS

 

Through our campus farms and forest research facilities we offer ample opportunities for students to engage in undergraduate research. Where to start?  

First, look at the SAFS Faculty and our NH AES pages to find out what research topics are being explored – what interests you?

Second, consider your options:

Third, make an appointment to talk with one or more faculty conducting research projects that interest you.  A simple, “I’m curious about your work and I’m interested in getting research experience – can you tell me more?” is a great place to start.  Once you learn more about ongoing projects, the two of you can explore which projects might be right for you.