News & Events

  • Tue, 01/17/2017

    UNH Scientist to Present Research on Soil Food Webs at NOFA-NH Conference

    Lesley Atwood collects soil fauna samples in a maize field. (Credit: Dave Mortensen) Lesley Atwood, a doctoral candidate in agroecology at the University of New Hampshire, will discuss the opportunities and unintended consequences of managing agricultural soil food webs at NOFA-NH Winter Conference, Saturday, Jan. 28, 2017.
  • Thu, 01/12/2017

    ABC News: Study: Some Bats Showing Resistance to Deadly Fungus

    The little brown bat, a species that has been decimated by a deadly fungus, could be taking the first tentative steps to recovery, scientists say in a recent study published by Great Britain's Royal Society.
  • Mon, 01/09/2017

    UNH Research: Some Bats Develop Resistance to Devastating Fungal Disease

    Some bat populations in North America appear to have developed resistance to the deadly fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome. Researchers from the University of New Hampshire analyzed infection data and population trends of the little brown bat in the eastern United States and found that persisting populations long exposed to the disease had much lower fungal infection levels at the end of winter than bat populations that were still declining and only recently exposed.
  • Mon, 01/09/2017

    Fosters: UNH research: Some bats develop resistance to devastating fungal disease

    Bats play an important role in controlling insect pests called insectivorous. They feast on insects each night, adding up to more than $3.7 billion worth of pest control each year in the U.S., according to the National Park Service. When bats are around to eat insects, there are fewer insect pests causing damage to crops, and farmers don't have to invest as much in pesticides.
  • Wed, 01/04/2017

    Morning Ag Clips: Soil adaptation to climate warming

    While scientists and policy experts debate the impacts of global warming, the Earth’s soil is releasing roughly nine times more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than all human activities combined. This huge carbon flux from soil, which is due to the natural respiration of soil microbes and plant roots, begs one of the central questions in climate change science. As the global climate warms, will soil respiration rates increase, adding even more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere and accelerating climate change? 
  • Tue, 01/03/2017

    UNH Research: Limited Sign of Soil Adaptation to Climate Warming

    Two soil warming experiments initiated by Serita Frey and Jerry Melillo with funding from the National Science Foundation to compare soil respiration rates in warmed and control plots at Harvard Forest in Petersham, Mass. Credit: Audrey Barker-Plotkin
  • Mon, 12/26/2016

    Union Leader: UNH bobcat study to help researchers understand 'landscape connectivity'

    How bobcats move around the state is the focus of a study recently completed by researchers at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Tue, 12/20/2016

    Are New Hampshire’s Bobcats Well-Connected?

    A New Hampshire bobcat stretches before hunting. New Hampshire is a pretty good place to live if you are a bobcat. And understanding how well bobcats move around the state within different habitats – called landscape connectivity – is critical to managing the state’s wildlife resources over the long term.
  • Mon, 12/19/2016

    Happy Holidays

  • Mon, 12/12/2016

    Meet Researcher Rick Cote

    Dr. Rick Cote is a professor of biochemistry, chair of the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences, and a longtime researcher with the NH Agricultural Experiment Station in the College of Life Sciences and Agriculture at UNH. To learn more about his research, visit https://colsa.unh.edu/administrator/cote.
  • Wed, 12/07/2016

    Nursery Management: Microbial traits determine abundance of soil organic matter

    Healthy soil is rich in organic matter, but scientists have yet to fully understand exactly how that organic matter is formed. Now a team of University of New Hampshire scientists have uncovered evidence that microbial pathways – not plants – are the chief originator of the organic matter found in stable soil carbon pools.
  • Wed, 12/07/2016

    EcoWatch: Can Eating Oysters Make You Sick?

    Food poisoning cases linked to eating oysters and other shellfish from New England waters have jumped from five cases in 2000 to 147 in 2013. A study from the University of New Hampshire links this increase to warming ocean waters.
  • Tue, 12/06/2016

    Corn and Soybean Digest: Research finds microbial traits, not plants, determine abundance of soil organic matter

    Healthy soil is rich in organic matter, but scientists have yet to fully understand exactly how that organic matter is formed. Now a team of University of New Hampshire scientists have uncovered evidence that microbial pathways – not plants – are the chief originator of the organic matter found in stable soil carbon pools. 
  • Mon, 12/05/2016

    UNH Research: Microbial Traits, not Plants, Determine Abundance of Soil Organic Matter

    Healthy soil is rich in organic matter, but scientists have yet to fully understand exactly how that organic matter is formed. Now a team of University of New Hampshire scientists have uncovered evidence that microbial pathways – not plants – are the chief originator of the organic matter found in stable soil carbon pools. 
  • Sun, 12/04/2016

    ABC News: New Hampshire Looks for Answers Behind Oyster Outbreaks

    Scientists are recognizing that a waterborne disease sickening tens of thousands of people each year is associated with warmer waters of the Gulf of Mexico moving northward, partly due to climate change. The problem is extremely rare in New Hampshire and neighboring Maine, but scientists have seen cases elsewhere in New England and expect it to become a bigger problem.
  • Wed, 11/30/2016

    Growing Produce: Keys To Successful Bell Pepper Production In High Tunnels

    Becky Sideman, Extension Professor and Specialist at the University of New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, conducted a trial on high tunnel bell peppers in 2015, and shares advice on what to look for in your pepper varieties, as well as additional management techniques that will help you produce strong, healthy yields.
  • Tue, 11/29/2016

    UNH Research Finds White Deaths Exceed Births in One-Third of U.S. States

    More whites died than were born in a record high 17 states in 2014 compared to just four in 2004, according to new research supported by the NH Agricultural Experiment Station.
  • Mon, 11/21/2016

    Lancaster Farming: UNH Ag Research Boosts New England’s Thanksgiving Bounty

    As New Englanders prepare to sit down to give thanks, their Thanksgiving table may be filled with an abundant supply of delicious, locally and regionally grown foods due to extensive agricultural research conducted by the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Thu, 11/17/2016

    Fosters: UNH agricultural research boosts Thanksgiving bounty

    As New Englanders prepare to sit down to give thanks, their Thanksgiving table may be filled with an abundant supply of delicious, locally and regionally grown foods due to extensive agricultural research conducted by the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at UNH.
  • Mon, 11/14/2016

    UNH Agricultural Research Boosts New England’s Thanksgiving Bounty

    For five decades, continuous support from the NH Agricultural Experiment Station has allowed J. Brent Loy, emeritus professor of plant genetics, to undertake the longest continuous cucurbit breeding program in North America.
  • Mon, 10/31/2016

    UNH Researchers One Step Closer to Predicting Bacteria Outbreaks in Great Bay Oysters

    University of New Hampshire scientists are one step closer to being able to predict when oysters in the Great Bay Estuary may be at risk of being infected with a bacteria that has sickened consumers throughout the Northeast.
  • Tue, 10/25/2016

    Morning Ag Clips: UNH dairies produce ‘Gold’ standard

    The Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center and the Organic Dairy Research Farm, both facilities of the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the UNH College of Life Sciences and Agriculture, have been awarded a 2015 Gold Quality Award by the Dairy Farmers of America.
  • Mon, 10/24/2016

    UNH Dairies Produce ‘Gold’ Standard of Milk

    The Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center and the Organic Dairy Research Farm, both facilities of the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture, have been awarded a 2015 Gold Quality Award by the Dairy Farmers of America.
  • Mon, 10/17/2016

    New UNH Bobcat Research Aims to Understand Why Wildcats Are Rebounding

    New Hampshire’s bobcats are rebounding despite increased development and human activities in their natural habitats and decreases in the availability of their prey. A new research project funded by the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire aims to understand why.
  • Mon, 10/17/2016

    Christian Science Monitor: Why are bobcats returning to New Hampshire?

    Despite a declining population of rabbits and other prey, the number of bobcats in the state has reached as many as 1,400, according to University of New Hampshire (UNH) biologists.  Now, researchers are looking into the ways that changes in land use, such as an increase in development and human activity, have affected the bobcat population in New Hampshire and the northern New England region.