Graduate Student Profiles

Tristan_Price

Tristan Price

Faculty Advisor: John Halstead
Research Topic: Environmental Economics and Policy.
Email: tristan.price@unh.edu
Research Description: I am currently surveying NH residents who primarily use a municipal water supply for their drinking water on their awareness, risk assessment, and willingness-to-pay for treatment of PFAS chemicals in those drinking water systems.

Natalie_Lord

Natalie Lord

Faculty Advisor: Catherine Ashcraft
Research Topic: Social equity and sustainable marine food systems
Email: natalie.lord@unh.edu
Research Description: Women make up half the workers in the global seafood supply chain and engage in all sectors of the marine food system from production to market. However, their roles in the fisheries and aquaculture sector are poorly understood and have largely been unaccounted for, which may have pervasive impacts on opportunities for social and economic progress for women in the field. My research aims to (1) share stories about women’s experiences as oyster producers in the aquaculture sector, (2) identify institutional barriers and opportunities for women to work as producers, (3) make recommendations for gender integration into aquaculture policy. As the aquaculture industries of NH and ME are poised for further expansion, now is the time to build an equitable marine food system!

Sarah_Reny

Sarah Reny

Faculty Advisor: Russell Congalton
Research Topic: Remote Sensing of the Environment
Email: sarah.reny@unh.edu
Research Description: Applying remote sensing technology to environmental data acquisition, and spatial data accuracy.

Kaitlyn Baillargeon

Kaitlyn Baillargeon

Advisor: Scott Ollinger
Research Topic: Estimating forest biodiversity using remote sensing imagery
Email: kaitlyn.baillargeon@unh.edu

 

 

 

 

 

Amy Arsenault

Amy Arsenault

Faculty Advisor: Mark Ducey
Research Topic: Outreach and engagement of nonindustrial private forest landowners
Email: amy.arsenault@unh.edu
Research Description: New Hampshire nonindustrial private forest landowners oversee 73% of the state’s forests, and the decisions made by these majority stakeholders have an enormous impact. As part of my work as the Forest Stewardship Outreach Program Manager for UNH Cooperative Extension, I am interested in studying outreach and engagement strategies to help landowners make informed decisions about their woodlots.

 

 

 
Keegan Feero

Keegan Feero

Faculty Advisor: Scott Ollinger
Research Topic: Linking forest landscape and physiological process models to wildlife conservation.
Email: keegan.feero@unh.edu
Research Description: With climate change, places which used to be optimal habitat for a wide variety of species has been shifting over time. Conserving and protecting habitat of native species (specifically those which are migratory, threatened, or endangered) is of special concern. I seek to model how wildlife habitat shifts in response to these changing climatic variables so we can provide the necessary management/intervention wherever needed before it is too late.

Joshua Buonpane

Joshua Buonpane

Faculty Advisor: Wilfred Wollheim
Email: joshua.buonpane@grad.unh.edu

 

 

 

Chris_Ziadeh

Chris Ziadeh

Faculty Advisor: Jeff Garnas
Research Topic: The change in insect communities between different silvicultural treatments and among seasons.
Email: christopher.ziadeh@unh.edu
Research Description: My research examines the impact of different silvicultural treatments on ground-active insect communities and how these same communities change throughout various seasons. I collect insects using pitfall traps during both the winter and late summer in a research site called the Second College Grant which is located in northern NH

emily_landry

Emily Landry

Faculty Advisor: Scott Ollinger
Research Topic: Forest Ecosystems
Email: emily.landry@unh.edu

 

 

 

 

Christine_Bunyon

Christine Bunyon

Faculty Advisor: Russell Congalton
Research Topic: The use of unmanned aerial systems to evaluate the extent of submerged aquatic vegetation and algae in impaired waterbodies.
Email: christine.bunyon@unh.edu
Research Description: Waterbodies in New Hampshire, as in many other places around the world, face increasing threats to water quality due to rapidly developing watershed landscapes and changing climates which impact the movement and availability of nutrients. Excess phosphorus, for example, stimulates the growth of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) and phytoplankton such as algae and cyanobacteria. The proliferation and subsequent death and decomposition of SAV and phytoplankton can deplete dissolved oxygen (DO), degrade aquatic habitat, trigger public health advisories, limit recreational use, and reduce property values. With the increasing public health threat that cyanobacteria blooms pose, it is even more crucial that we continue to explore ways to improve our efficiency and ability to monitor water quality. Current monitoring methods for assessing SAV and phytoplankton consist of performing quadrant-based counts and collecting surface grab or limnetic core samples for analysis of total phosphorus, chlorophyll-a, and cyanobacteria/cyanotoxin cell counts. While useful, these traditional methods are time intensive, restrict sampling locations to those that are easily accessible, and represent only a small fraction of a waterbody. In the case of phytoplankton, blooms are often short-lived and, if free floating, can be transported by wind or wave action and thus be difficult to capture by traditional methods. I plan to conduct a study that quantifies the total biomass of SAV and phytoplankton in shallow aquatic systems over the course of the growing season using a UAS approach with digital sensors in both true color and multi-spectral wavelengths, including the red edge and NIR that are most applicable to SAV. Multiple flyovers throughout the growing season will illuminate a trend through time for the total biomass of SAV and phytoplankton using their acquired reflectance values.

Talia_Kuras

Talia Kuras

Faculty Advisor: Adrienne Kovach
Research Topic: Saltmarsh and Nelson’s Sparrows
Email: talia.kuras@unh.edu
Research Description: I am broadly interested in topics related to saltmarsh sparrow paternity, mate choice, and hybridization with closely related Nelson’s sparrows at study sites in southern Maine and coastal New Hampshire.

 

 

 

Hayleigh_Hildebrand

Hayleigh Hildebrand

Faculty Advisor: Stuart Grandy
Research Topic: Saltmarsh and Nelson’s Sparrows
Email: hayleigh.hildebrand@unh.edu
Research Description: My project's goal is to better understand nutrient (specially nitrogen) dynamics at the micro-scale in soil fractions such as particulate organic matter (POM) and mineral associated organic matter (MAOM) under different treatments such as fertilizer input, soil type and texture to better understand how to steward agricultural land more sustainably.

Emily_Lever

Emily Lever

Faculty Advisor: Wilfred Wollheim
Research Topic: The role of flow conditions and storm regimes on plastic fluxes through river networks.
Email: emily.lever@unh.edu

 

 

Maria_Poisson

Mairi Poisson

Faculty Advisor: Rem Moll
Research Topic: Dynamics of carnivore-mesocarnivore interactions, human-wildlife interactions and conflict.
Email: mairi.poisson@unh.edu
Research Description: I am broadly interested in carnivore-mesocarnivore interactions and human-wildlife interactions. I will be utilizing camera trap data throughout New Hampshire to better understand these dynamics and their potential implications for wildlife management.

Michael Thompson

Michael Thompson

Faculty Advisor: Rebecca Rowe
Research Topic: Avian functional diversity across an economic forest degradation gradient.
Email: m.thompson@unh.edu
Research Description: My work looks at how avian functional diversity changes across forests that have a decreasing economic value based on the degradation framework put forth by Gunn et al 2019.

 

 

Ben Borgman-Winter

Ben Borgman-Winter

Faculty Advisor: Rebecca Rowe
Research Topic: Rodent-fungal ecology in the context of forest disturbance and regeneration.
Email: benjamin.borgman-winter@unh.edu
Research Description: I study how fungi respond to timber harvest in northern New Hampshire. I examine this question from two angles: 1) shifts in fungal fruiting patterns after logging events, and 2) fungal spore dispersal into these disturbed forests by both wind and small mammals.

 

David Heit

David Heit

Faculty Advisor: Remington Moll
Research Topic: Quantitative spatial ecology of ungulates
Email: david.heit@unh.edu
Research Description: I am investigating how the selection of spatial and temporal scale affects analyses of white-tailed deer behavior and habitat selection.