Graduate Student Profiles

Tristan Price

Tristan Price

Faculty Advisor: John Halstead
Research Topic: Public risk assessment of PFAS chemicals in residential drinking water.
Email: tcp1023@wildcats.unh.edu
Research Description: We are aiming to elucidate the public's risk assessment of PFAS in their drinking water and willingness-to-pay for some level of treatment of those water systems.

 
Kaitlyn Baillargeon

Kaitlyn Baillargeon

Advisor: Scott Ollinger
Research Topic: Estimating forest biodiversity using remote sensing imagery
Email: kab2014@wildcats.unh.edu

 

 

 

 

 

Amy Arsenault

Amy Arsenault

Faculty Advisor: Mark Ducey
Research Topic: Outreach and engagement of nonindustrial private forest landowners
Email: amy.arsenault@unh.edu
Research Description: New Hampshire nonindustrial private forest landowners oversee 73% of the state’s forests, and the decisions made by these majority stakeholders have an enormous impact. As part of my work as the Forest Stewardship Outreach Program Manager for UNH Cooperative Extension, I am interested in studying outreach and engagement strategies to help landowners make informed decisions about their woodlots.

 

 

 
Jordan Strater

Jordan Strater

Advisor: John Halstead
Research Topic: Factors Affecting Purchase of Locally Grown Produce: A Case Study of New Hampshire Markets
Email: jps1005@wildcats.unh.edu

Keegan Feero

Keegan Feero

Faculty Advisor: Scott Ollinger
Research Topic: Linking forest landscape and physiological process models to wildlife conservation.
Email: kgf1002@wildcats.unh.edu
Research Description: With climate change, places which used to be optimal habitat for a wide variety of species has been shifting over time. Conserving and protecting habitat of native species (specifically those which are migratory, threatened, or endangered) is of special concern. I seek to model how wildlife habitat shifts in response to these changing climatic variables so we can provide the necessary management/intervention wherever needed before it is too late.

Anna Lowien

Anna Lowien

Faculty Advisor: William McDowell
Research Topic: Biogeochemical stressors and ecological response in Great Bay Estuary
Email: al1290@wildcats.unh.edu
Research Description: Great Bay estuary is increasingly influenced by changes in land use and climate. Increasing impervious surface cover, annual precipitation totals, and storm intensity throughout the northeastern United States are altering biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles. These alterations lead to increased material transport from the surrounding landscape that affects water quality conditions within estuarine ecosystems like Great Bay. The consequences of high material inputs include Great Bay being designated as nitrogen impaired and significant declines in eelgrass distribution. These stressors are expected to continue to exert pressure on Great Bay, underscoring the need to understand the impacts on the ecological, economical, and recreational value of this coastal ecosystem. Using a mass balance approach, I am assessing the biogeochemical function of Great Bay through development of annual and monthly solute budgets for nutrients, carbon, and sediments. Results will advance understanding of the connections between estuarine biogeochemical cycles and biotic responses. This approach moves beyond an input-focused management strategy by accounting for both the storage and export of solutes from the estuary.

Joshua Buonpane

Joshua Buonpane

Faculty Advisor: Wilfred Wollheim
Email: joshua.buonpane@grad.unh.edu

 

 

 

Chris Ziadeh

Chris Ziadeh

Faculty Advisor: Jeff Garnas
Research Topic: Ground active insect diversity and how it relates to snowpack depth and duration.
Email: cz1008@wildcats.unh.edu
Research Description: Terrestrial insect diversity is on average declining worldwide. Many insects depend on snow cover to insulate them from the extreme ambient conditions present in winter. Therefore climate change and the decrease in seasonal snowpack depth and duration is suspected to be a potential driver of this decline in insect diversity. My study takes place up in the Second College Grant, a Dartmouth College-owned property in Northern NH. I use pitfall traps to sample ground active insects in both the winter and summer months.

Christina Lyons

Christina Lyons

Faculty Advisor: Stuart Grandy
Research Topic: Soil enzyme activity and interactions with soil particles.
Email: cal1037@wildcats.unh.edu
Research Description: Soil biogeochemical processes are mediated by enzymes. Enzymes are unevenly distributed across soil particles. The unique properties of soil particles can impact the level of activity exhibited by enzymes. My research synthesizes data on enzyme activity across soil size fractions and conceptualizes enzyme-particle interactions. 

 

Michael Thompson

Michael Thompson

Faculty Advisor: Rebecca Rowe
Research Topic: Impacts of forest degradation on plant and animal functional diversity
Email: m.thompson@unh.edu
Research Description: Over the past few decades, poor silvicultural practices have cause nearly 40% of northern new england forests to be of poor timber quality otherwise termed "degraded". My research focuses on the functional diversity of tree, bird and mammal communities across this degradation gradient and how they may shift in functional space. This work will be important in helping to guide future forestry methods and better assist landowners and managers in the best silvicultural methods to use.
 

Ben Borgman-Winter

Ben Borgman-Winter

Faculty Advisor: Rebecca Rowe
Research Topic: Rodent-fungal ecology in the context of forest disturbance and regeneration.
Email: bwb1018@wildcats.unh.edu
Research Description: I study how fungi respond to timber harvest in northern New Hampshire. I examine this question from two angles: 1) shifts in fungal fruiting patterns after logging events, and 2) fungal spore dispersal into these disturbed forests by both wind and small mammals.

 

David Heit

David Heit

Faculty Advisor: Remington Moll
Research Topic: Quantitative spatial ecology of ungulates
Email: dh1157@wildcats.unh.edu
Research Description: I am investigating how the selection of spatial and temporal scale affects analyses of white-tailed deer behavior and habitat selection.