News & Events

  • Tue, 01/16/2018

    NH Agricultural Experiment Station Scientists to Present Research on Agriculture, Forestry at 2018 NH Farm and Forest Expo

    What is New England’s role in the global battle against wheat stem rust? How have day neutral strawberries extended the state’s strawberry season? And how are unmanned aerial vehicles improving the accuracy of remote mapping of NH’s forestry resources? Researchers with the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire researchers will present their latest research on these topics and more at the 2018 New Hampshire Farm and Forest Expo.
  • Mon, 01/15/2018

    Tree Source: Wood pellets outperform fossil fuels in reducing greenhouse emissions

    Using wood pellets for home heating fuel reduces greenhouse gas emissions by more than half over fossil fuels and natural gas, according to new research from the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 01/08/2018

    NHPR: UNH Researchers Develop Scales To Measure Snowfall In Real Time

    Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have a new way of measuring snow totals this winter that could help them learn more about climate change.
  • Mon, 01/08/2018

    Fruit Growers News: Effects of climate change could accelerate

      If carbon dioxide emissions continue at the current rate, they report that scenarios of future conditions could not only lead to a significant decrease in snow days, but also an increase in the number of summer days over 90 degrees and a drastic decline in stream habitat with 40 percent not suitable for cold water fish.
  • Mon, 01/08/2018

    Experiment Station Researchers Find Effects of Climate Change Could Accelerate By Mid-Century

    Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire say the effects of climate change could be much stronger by the middle of the 21st century, and a number of ecosystem and weather conditions could consistently decline even more in the future.
  • Tue, 01/02/2018

    NIFA-USDA: UNH Researchers Find Drastic Decline in N.H.’s Bumble Bees

    In the first long-term study of New Hampshire’s bumble bee population, researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have found three of the state’s most important bumble bee species have experienced drastic declines and range constriction over the last 150 years, with a fourth bee also in significant decline.
  • Mon, 12/25/2017

    Union Leader: UNH research: Dramatic decline in NH bumble bees

    In the first long-term study of the state’s bumble bee population, researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have found three of the state’s most important bumble bee species have experienced drastic declines and range constriction over the last 150 years, with a fourth bee also in significant decline. 
  • Wed, 12/20/2017

    Concord Monitor: Study points to a stinging decline in state’s bumble bee population

    The New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire recently finished the first long-term study of the state’s bumble bee populations. What they found was startling: three of the state’s most important species have experienced drastic population decline and range constriction – where the bees can be found – over the past 150 years, with a fourth bee also in significant decline, according to researchers.
  • Tue, 12/19/2017

    WMUR: Drastic drop seen in NH bumblebee population, UNH study shows

    Researchers at the University of New Hampshire said that the bumblebee population is on the decline in the Granite State.
  • Mon, 12/18/2017

    UNH Researchers Find Drastic Decline in N.H.’s Bumble Bees

    In the first long-term study of New Hampshire’s bumble bee population, researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have found three of the state’s most important bumble bee species have experienced drastic declines and range constriction over the last 150 years, with a fourth bee also in significant decline.   
  • Thu, 12/14/2017

    Boston Globe: UNH researchers say effects of climate change are coming sooner than we think

    By Alyssa Meyers GLOBE CORRESPONDENT  DECEMBER 14, 2017 Researchers at the University of New Hampshire say major effects of climate change could be felt sooner than we think in New England — by mid-century.
  • Mon, 12/11/2017

    New Snow Scales Let UNH Researchers Measure Changes in NH’s Snowpack in Real Time

    This winter University of New Hampshire researchers will monitor New Hampshire’s snowpack in real time using new sophisticated snow scales installed at the Kingman Research Farm, a facility of the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station.
  • Mon, 12/04/2017

    Stronger Storms Hamper Ability of Streams and Rivers to Clean Up Pollution

    Freshwater streams and rivers naturally clean up some forms of pollution originating from urban and agricultural areas, but increased storm intensity reduces this ability, which underscores the need to improve the management of nonpoint sources of pollution and storm water management.
  • Mon, 11/27/2017

    State’s Food Pantries Enjoy Fresh Food Grown at UNH Farms and Facilities

    New Hampshire residents who rely on the state’s food pantries have been enjoying fresh food donated by the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire, including tilapia and lettuce produced in sophisticated aquaponics systems and squash and other vegetables grown at university farms.
  • Mon, 11/20/2017

    Wood Pellets Outperform Fossil Fuels, Natural Gas in Reducing Greenhouse Gases

    DURHAM, N.H. – Using wood pellets for home heating fuel reduces greenhouse gas emissions by more than half over fossil fuels and natural gas, according to new research from the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 11/06/2017

    UNH Professor’s Book Demonstrates Power of Using Imagery for Geospatial Analysis

    Geospatial analysis is a powerful tool widely used to address a number of issues, including climate change modeling, weather monitoring, human population forecasting, and animal population management. Now a new book by a University of New Hampshire professor demonstrates the power of incorporating remotely sensed imagery in geospatial analysis.
  • Mon, 10/30/2017

    UNH Dairies Produce Gold Standard of Milk

    The Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center and the Organic Dairy Research Farm, both facilities of the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture, have been awarded 2016 Special Gold Certificate Awards by the Dairy Farmers of America
  • Mon, 10/23/2017

    UNH Research: Sustaining Local Farms Top Factor in Deciding to Buy Fresh Produce

    When it comes to buying fresh produce, northern New Englanders value maintaining local farmland, supporting the local economy, and buying produce without pesticides, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire.
  • Wed, 10/18/2017

    UNH Scientists to Develop First Strawberry Varieties Specifically for U.S. Organic Production

    Scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have launched a research project that aims to develop the first varieties of strawberries specifically designed for organic agriculture in the United States. 
  • Mon, 10/16/2017

    UNH Hosts Screening of Film ‘Food Evolution’ Nov. 16

    The University of New Hampshire will host a screening of the film Food Evolution, which explores the debate surrounding plant breeding approaches, including  genetic engineering and related methods.
  • Thu, 10/05/2017

    Washington Post: One of the oldest climate change experiments has led to a troubling conclusion

    A major climate change study reinforces fears about the possibility of a climate change "feedback" involving the planet’s soils, one that could pile on top of and substantially worsen the ongoing warming trend triggered by the burning of fossil fuels.
  • Wed, 10/04/2017

    Bennington Banner: Chirp, click, buzz - Last call for the insect orchestra

    This time of year, I keep the windows cracked open on even marginally warm nights, savoring the sweet air that sifts through the screens. On that air comes the sound of others relishing the last bit of warmth before frost settles in: namely, crickets and katydids.
  • Wed, 10/04/2017

    Union Leader: UNH professor recognized for 50 years of food research

    Dozens of colleagues and former students turned out Tuesday evening to celebrate a research professor who is creating new varieties of spineless yellow summer squash, striped ornamental pumpkins and rootstocks for melon grafting.
  • Mon, 10/02/2017

    Crop Mixtures: Do They Add Up?

    An increasingly popular strategy for growing crops to be used as cover or for forage is to plant them in diverse mixtures rather than as monocultures. The reasoning behind this strategy is that mixtures of cover or forage crops should use resources more efficiently and therefore should be more productive, weed suppressive, and beneficial to soil quality and health than monocultures. In this 2017 Farm and Forest Expo video, Dr. Rich Smith discusses whether the evidence supports these assumptions using data from his ongoing research on annual forage crops.
  • Mon, 10/02/2017

    NHPR: Protecting New Hampshire's Trees: Elm, Ash, and Chestnut

    Jeff Garnas, a researcher with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, and University of New Hampshire assistant professor of ecology, discusses efforts to protect elm, ash, and chestnut trees.