News & Events

  • Mon, 02/19/2018

    Preventing the Stem Rust-Barberry Link that Devastates Cereal Crops

    Stem rust is one of the most feared agricultural diseases in the world, infecting wheat and other cereal crops. The fungal pathogen is capable of severe epidemics, thus presenting a threat to the global food supply. In New England, the disease is a concern in light of the region’s re-emerging small grain industry.
  • Thu, 02/15/2018

    NHPR: EPA Chief Signals Push To Declare Wood Energy Carbon-Neutral On N.H. Visit

    NHAES researcher Dr. John Gunn says the polluting effects of burning wood are complex, and hinge on the kind and amount of material harvested, how it’s used, and what fuel it replaces. "If you're talking about, truly, residues from sawmills or the tops and limbs that were left over from harvest anyway, those have very good greenhouse gas emissions profiles compared to other scenarios where you're harvesting whole trees specifically for biomass energy uses, and those trees could have remained standing. That all matters in terms of the outcome, in terms of whether or not making energy from wood is better for the atmosphere than making energy from a fossil fuel.” 
  • Thu, 02/15/2018

    Katherine Sinacore: From UNH to Panama

    Katherine Sinacore, who will graduate this May with a PhD in Natural Resources and Earth System Sciences, conducted research with New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station scientists Dr. Heidi Asbjornsen and Dr. Ted Howard. Learn about why she chose UNH for her graduate studies, what she researched, and what she's gained from her research experience.
  • Wed, 02/14/2018

    Morning Ag Clips: UNH organic dairy takes gold for milk quality

    In the last year, the Organic Dairy Research Farm has increased organic milk production by nearly 127,000 pounds as a result of management practices implemented by the farm’s new manager Ryan Courtright. A dairy farmer originally from Pennsylvania, Courtright began managing the farm in April 2017. In addition to improving management practices, he also has reduced feed costs at the farm. He considers the research farm as an important role model for the organic dairy industry in regards to herd health and management, and best business practices that improve the bottom line for producers.
  • Wed, 02/14/2018

    Fosters: UNH Organic Dairy Research Farm takes home the gold

    The Organic Dairy Research Farm, a facility of the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire, has taken home the gold for outstanding milk quality, receiving a 2017 Gold Quality Award from the Organic Valley Cooperative.
  • Mon, 02/12/2018

    UNH Organic Dairy Research Farm Takes Home Gold for Milk Quality

    The Organic Dairy Research Farm, a facility of the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture, has taken home the gold for outstanding milk quality, receiving a 2017 Gold Quality Award from the Organic Valley Cooperative.
  • Wed, 02/07/2018

    Fosters: UNH Research: Beetles bear offspring based on food scarcity

    By understanding the behavior of burying beetles related to their reproduction and parental care, scientists can better understand the genetic and physiological mechanisms that modify parental care behaviors of insects in variable environments.
  • Wed, 02/07/2018

    Morning Ag Clips: Beetles limit offspring when food is scarce

    “As humans, we have a pocketbook with a certain amount of currency available to pay for food, housing, and clothing. This pocketbook is limited and informs what we can afford to purchase and support. The beetles are much like this. If resources are limited, then the number of offspring they can successfully raise also is constrained,” said NH Agricultural Experiment Station researcher Daniel Howard, assistant professor of biological sciences.
  • Mon, 02/05/2018

    Beetle Parents Choose to Limit Offspring When Food is Scarce

    Researchers have long known that many primates make decisions about the number of children they have based on the availability of resources such as food. Now new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire finds that some insects – specifically burying beetles – also choose to limit offspring when food is scarce.
  • Thu, 02/01/2018

    Farms.com: UNH Research Finds Feeding Pregnant Dairy Cows Niacin Improves Quality of Milk

    Feeding pregnant dairy cows the vitamin niacin prior to giving birth improved the quality of their colostrum, which is the first milk calves drink, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire. Colostrum is essential to building the immune systems of calves, and thus, their survival.
  • Tue, 01/30/2018

    Fosters: UNH finds a key to better milk quality

    “Calves are the foundation of the herd and are necessary to replace the cows that leave the herd for various reasons,” said Peter Erickson, professor of dairy management who conducted the research with Kayla Aragona, a doctoral candidate in animal science. “They also are the third greatest cost for the dairy producer, behind feed and labor, respectively. Reducing health costs and improving growth will result in a better bottom line for the producer.”
  • Tue, 01/30/2018

    Dairy Business: Feeding Prepartum Dairy Cows Niacin Improves Quality of Their Colostrum

    Feeding prepartum dairy cows the vitamin niacin prior to giving birth improved the quality of their colostrum, which is the first milk calves drink, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station. Colostrum is essential to building the immune systems of calves, and thus, their survival.
  • Mon, 01/29/2018

    Feeding Prepartum Dairy Cows Niacin Improves Quality of Their Colostrum

    Feeding prepartum dairy cows the vitamin niacin prior to giving birth improved the quality of their colostrum, which is the first milk calves drink, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station. Colostrum is essential to building the immune systems of calves, and thus, their survival.
  • Tue, 01/23/2018

    Fosters: Researchers at UNH developing fine dining for Nemo and Dory

    Ornamental aquarium fish like the clownfish Nemo and his pal the royal blue tang Dory one day may be dining on high-quality yet inexpensive white worms grown in New England. New research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire has found that live white worms are well-suited for the ornamental aquaculture industry and could be an emerging commercial industry for the region.
  • Mon, 01/22/2018

    Union Leader: UNH scientists will present latest research at Farm and Forest Expo

    What is New England’s role in the global battle against wheat stem rust? How have day neutral strawberries extended the state’s strawberry season? And how are unmanned aerial vehicles improving the accuracy of remote mapping of NH’s forestry resources?
  • Mon, 01/22/2018

    Union Leader: New scales give UNH scientists clues about NH's snowpack

    This winter, University of New Hampshire researchers will monitor the snowpack in real time using new snow scales installed at the Kingman Research Farm in Madbury.
  • Mon, 01/22/2018

    Feeding Nemo: White Worms Show Potential as Inexpensive Food Source for Aquarium Fish

    Ornamental aquarium fish like the clownfish Nemo and his pal the royal blue tang Dory one day may be dining on high-quality yet inexpensive white worms grown in New England. New research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire has found that live white worms are well-suited for the ornamental aquaculture industry and could be an emerging commercial industry for the region.
  • Fri, 01/19/2018

    American Agriculturalist: 9 reasons to visit New Hampshire Farm and Forest Expo

    A series of educational sessions will be hosted by the University of New Hampshire Ag Experiment Station scientists in the Frost and Hawthorne rooms. The aim is to help those working in the forestry and agricultural fields make informed decisions about their own businesses.
  • Tue, 01/16/2018

    NH Agricultural Experiment Station Scientists to Present Research on Agriculture, Forestry at 2018 NH Farm and Forest Expo

    What is New England’s role in the global battle against wheat stem rust? How have day neutral strawberries extended the state’s strawberry season? And how are unmanned aerial vehicles improving the accuracy of remote mapping of NH’s forestry resources? Researchers with the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire researchers will present their latest research on these topics and more at the 2018 New Hampshire Farm and Forest Expo.
  • Mon, 01/15/2018

    Tree Source: Wood pellets outperform fossil fuels in reducing greenhouse emissions

    Using wood pellets for home heating fuel reduces greenhouse gas emissions by more than half over fossil fuels and natural gas, according to new research from the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 01/08/2018

    NHPR: UNH Researchers Develop Scales To Measure Snowfall In Real Time

    Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have a new way of measuring snow totals this winter that could help them learn more about climate change.
  • Mon, 01/08/2018

    Fruit Growers News: Effects of climate change could accelerate

      If carbon dioxide emissions continue at the current rate, they report that scenarios of future conditions could not only lead to a significant decrease in snow days, but also an increase in the number of summer days over 90 degrees and a drastic decline in stream habitat with 40 percent not suitable for cold water fish.
  • Mon, 01/08/2018

    Experiment Station Researchers Find Effects of Climate Change Could Accelerate By Mid-Century

    Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire say the effects of climate change could be much stronger by the middle of the 21st century, and a number of ecosystem and weather conditions could consistently decline even more in the future.
  • Tue, 01/02/2018

    NIFA-USDA: UNH Researchers Find Drastic Decline in N.H.’s Bumble Bees

    In the first long-term study of New Hampshire’s bumble bee population, researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have found three of the state’s most important bumble bee species have experienced drastic declines and range constriction over the last 150 years, with a fourth bee also in significant decline.
  • Mon, 12/25/2017

    Union Leader: UNH research: Dramatic decline in NH bumble bees

    In the first long-term study of the state’s bumble bee population, researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have found three of the state’s most important bumble bee species have experienced drastic declines and range constriction over the last 150 years, with a fourth bee also in significant decline.