News & Events

  • Mon, 05/21/2018

    Andrea Jilling: Investigating the Plant-Microbe Relationship

    Andrea Jilling, who will graduate in 2019 with a doctorate in natural resources and Earth system sciences, conducted research with New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station scientist Dr. Stuart Grandy. Learn about why she chose UNH for her graduate studies, what she researches, and what she's gained from her research experience.
  • Sun, 05/20/2018

    Union Leader: UNH scientists develop method to estimate New England cottontail population

     Scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire say they have developed a method to estimate the abundance of New England cottontail populations. 
  • Mon, 05/14/2018

    UNH Scientists Develop Method to Estimate New England Cottontail Population

    Scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have developed a method to estimate the abundance of New England cottontail populations. The noninvasive method provides an important tool in the effort to conserve this region’s only native rabbit.
  • Mon, 05/14/2018

    Concord Monitor: How do you count cottontail rabbits when it’s hard to even find them?

    Scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have developed a method to estimate the abundance of New England cottontail populations. The noninvasive method provides an important tool in the effort to conserve this region’s only native rabbit, a state-endangered species in Maine and New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 05/14/2018

    Boston Globe: Researchers develop way to keep track of New England cottontail in effort to save them

    They’re rabbits, but they’re not multiplying. The New England cottontail, the region’s only native rabbit species, is in decline, and researchers from the University of New Hampshire recently identified a non-invasive method to more accurately count the rabbits and assess the status of the population. To do that, they’re using fecal pellets.
  • Thu, 05/10/2018

    Concord Monitor: A good seed: UNH researcher breeding new varieties of crops

    The names Smooth Operator, Naked Bear and Blonde Beauty may sound like song titles from the ’70s, but for University of New Hampshire plant genetics researcher Brent Loy, they are the affectionate names of his most recent work.
  • Thu, 05/10/2018

    Fosters: New squash, melon, pumpkin seeds bred at UNH

    Gardeners preparing to plant their fruits and vegetables have a number of new summer squash, melon and pumpkins options that were developed at the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire by a researcher who represents the longest continuous squash and pumpkin breeding program in North America.
  • Mon, 05/07/2018

    Just in Time for Planting Season: New Squash, Melon, and Pumpkin Seeds Developed at UNH Now Available

    Gardeners preparing to plant their fruits and vegetables have a number of new summer squash, melon and pumpkins to choose from this year that were developed at the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire by a researcher who represents the longest continuous squash and pumpkin breeding program in North America.
  • Mon, 05/07/2018

    Concord Monitor: Who needs CRISPR – UNH success shows plain old cross-breeding can modify plant genetics like crazy

    Gardeners preparing to plant their fruits and vegetables have a number of new summer squash, melon and pumpkins options that were developed at the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire by a researcher who represents the longest continuous squash and pumpkin breeding program in North America.
  • Sun, 05/06/2018

    Union Leader: UNH study sheds new light on saltmarsh sparrows

    In many bird species, females have the ability to control the sex of individual eggs. “This means that offspring sex ratios are not usually left to chance,” a University of New Hampshire news release states. “From an evolutionary standpoint, this can be very beneficial, as different circumstances may favor the success of sons versus daughters.” But researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station have found that saltmarsh sparrows do not appear to manipulate the sex of their offspring.
  • Mon, 04/30/2018

    UNH Research Finds Saltmarsh Sparrows Support Gender Equality

    Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station have found that unlike some other birds, Saltmarsh Sparrows do not appear to manipulate the sex of their offspring based on environmental or maternal conditions as might be expected based on evolutionary theory. 
  • Mon, 04/30/2018

    Concord Monitor: Unusually, saltmarsh sparrows don’t tweak the gender of their chicks

    In birds, females have the ability to control the sex of individual eggs; therefore, a mother may be able to choose whether she prefers each egg laid to be a male or female. From an evolutionary standpoint, this can be very beneficial, as different circumstances may favor the success of sons versus daughters. But researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have found that saltmarsh sparrows do not appear to manipulate the sex of their offspring based on environmental or maternal conditions as might be expected.
  • Mon, 04/23/2018

    Ryan Stephens: Digging Into Truffle Research

    Wisconsin resident Ryan Stephens, who will graduate this summer with a doctorate in natural resources and Earth system sciences, conducted research with New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station scientist Dr. Rebecca Rowe. Learn about why he chose UNH for his graduate studies, what he researched, and what he's gained from his research experience.
  • Sun, 04/22/2018

    Union Leader: UNH researchers discover previously undiagnosed parasite, virus infecting Canada lynx

    Scientists with the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire say they have discovered a previously undiagnosed parasite and virus in the Canada lynx. 
  • Wed, 04/18/2018

    Washington Post: Parasite transmitted by ticks found in Canada lynx

    The Canada lynx, listed as a threatened species by the federal government, may have one more thing to worry about. University of New Hampshire scientists on Monday announced they have discovered a previously undiagnosed parasite transmitted by ticks as well as a virus in the medium-sized cat known for its long ears. The virus is similar to the Epstein-Barr virus that causes mononucleosis in humans and is related to a virus that infects domestic cats.
  • Mon, 04/16/2018

    NH Veterinary Diagnostic Lab Discovers Previously Unknown Parasite, Virus in Canada Lynx

    Scientists with the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire have discovered a previously undiagnosed parasite and virus in the Canada Lynx. The parasite, transmitted by ticks, is a known to infect domestic dogs. The virus is similar to the Epstein-Barr virus that causes mononucleosis in humans and is related to a virus that infects domestic cats.
  • Tue, 04/10/2018

    Union Leader: New England's white pines being damaged by disease

    White pine needle damage is being accelerated by the region’s warmer, wetter springs and is affecting the growth and health of New England’s eastern white pines, according to research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 04/09/2018

    Will Hastings: Caring for UNH's Kiwiberry Vineyard

    Contoocook resident Will Hastings, who will graduate this May with a master’s in biology, agricultural sciences, conducted research with New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station scientist Dr. Iago Hale. Learn about why he chose UNH for his graduate studies, what he researched, and what he's gained from his research experience.
  • Fri, 04/06/2018

    Morning Ag Clips: The impact of White Pine Needle Damage

    White Pine Needle Damage, a complex of foliar diseases that is being accelerated by the region’s warmer, wetter springs, is slowing the growth and hampering the health of New England’s eastern white pines, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Cameron McItnire
    Mon, 04/02/2018

    White Pine Needle Damage Slowing Growth, Hampering Health of Region’s Trees

    White Pine Needle Damage, a complex of foliar diseases that is being accelerated by the region’s warmer, wetter springs, is slowing the growth and hampering the health of the region’s eastern white pines, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 04/02/2018

    Concord Monitor: In warmer climates, a native fungus becomes a threat to white pine

    “This new disease impacts one of New Hampshire’s most widespread and economically important tree species,” said Heidi Asbjornsen, associate professor of natural resources and the environment and researcher with the NH Agricultural Experiment Station. “Eastern white pine composes more than 500,000 acres of New Hampshire forest land. Of the estimated 30 billion board feet of saw timber, 31 percent is white pine.”
  • Rory Carroll
    Mon, 03/26/2018

    Rory Carroll: Investigating NH’s Charismatic Predator, the Bobcat

    Rory Carroll, who will graduate in May 2019 with a PhD in wildlife and conservation biology, has conducted extensive research about the state’s bobcat population with New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station scientist Dr. Marian Litvaitis. Learn about why he chose UNH for his graduate studies, what he researched, and what he's gained from his research experience.
  • Tue, 03/20/2018

    Union Leader: UNH to hold greenhouse open house

    The University of New Hampshire Greenhouse Open House will be held at the Macfarlane Research Greenhouses on Friday and Saturday. The greenhouses will be open from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. both days. The event is free and open to the public.
  • Mon, 03/19/2018

    UNH Alum Returns Home for Pathology Externship at NH Veterinary Diagnostic Lab

    Jackie Marinoff’s dream of becoming a veterinarian has taken her far from the University of New Hampshire since she graduated in 2013 with her undergraduate degree in equine studies/pre-veterinary medicine. Recently she recently returned to campus for an intense, three-week pathology externship at the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Lab (NHVDL).