News & Events

  • Mon, 06/25/2018

    Is New Hampshire the Center of the Leafhopper Universe?

    Granite Staters sometimes quip that New Hampshire is the Center of the Universe, but is it also the center of the leafhopper universe? Three decades of research by scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire show that the state has more than 600 species of leafhoppers, or Cicadellidae, clearly surpassing the next largest family of insects documented in the UNH Insect Collection. 
  • Mon, 06/25/2018

    Union Leader: UNH scientists experiment with drones to collect forestry data

    Scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire recently analyzed the effectiveness of unmanned aerial systems to collect forestry data to assess ecological changes of forests and land cover.
  • Mon, 06/25/2018

    Portsmouth Herald: Celebrate the strawberry at festivals around the Seacoast

    Is this year a good one for strawberries? Experiment station researcher Becky Sideman said that although there were some cold weeks at the start of the growing season, strawberry crops had not encountered any “major setbacks” this year. New England weather makes this a challenging region for strawberry farmers, Sideman said, “because we have weather that makes it tricky, in some seasons, to get a good crop. When you have a lot of rainfall and/or hail events during flowering and fruiting, that can dramatically reduce yields.”
  • Mon, 06/25/2018

    Concord Monitor: Welcome to The Leafhopper State!

    Granite Staters sometimes quip that New Hampshire is the center of the universe, but is it also the center of the leafhopper universe? Three decades of research by scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire show that the state has more than 600 species of leafhoppers, or Cicadellidae, clearly surpassing the next largest family of insects documented in the UNH Insect Collection.
  • Fri, 06/22/2018

    NHPR: Something Wild: What Happens to Trees in Drought?

    Times of drought can present problems for trees, but it depends on the type of tree. Heidi Asbjornsen, a professor of ecosystem ecology at the University of New Hampshire, has been making close study of the effects of drought on trees, which will prove useful data to have, as she says “Climate change forecast suggests that in the future, although we’ll likely experience more total rainfall, we’re also expected to see more frequent and severe droughts.”
  • Mon, 06/18/2018

    UNH Scientists Analyze Effectiveness of Unmanned Aerial Systems to Map Seacoast Forests

    The collection of imagery from Unmanned Aerial Systems offer scientists novel methods and strategies to assess ecological changes of forests and land cover. However, their rapid extension into new disciplines brings with it a necessity to understand data quality of the respective products. Scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire recently analyzed effectiveness of Unmanned Aerial Systems to collect meaningful forestry data, which is key for making informed environmental policy decisions.
  • Wed, 06/13/2018

    Morning Ag Clips: 2018 New England Bee Bioblitz

    New England bee enthusiasts will head to Cheshire County in mass for the 2018 Annual New England Bee Bioblitz organized by the University of New Hampshire Bee Lab and supported by the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station. The event takes place at Pisgah State Park June 22-24, 2018, and is free and open to the public.
  • Mon, 06/11/2018

    UNH Bee Lab Hosts 2018 New England Bee Bioblitz in Cheshire County June 22-24

    New England bee enthusiasts will head to Cheshire County in mass for the 2018 Annual New England Bee Bioblitz organized by the University of New Hampshire Bee Lab and supported by the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station. The event takes place at Pisgah State Park June 22-24, 2018, and is free and open to the public.
  • Mon, 06/11/2018

    ABC News: Pine-killing southern beetle may be more deadly in North

    A beetle that has killed millions of acres of pines in southern forests is munching its way north, and new research suggests its tree-killing prowess could be magnified in cooler climes.
  • Mon, 06/11/2018

    New York Times: Pine-Killing Southern Beetle May Be More Deadly in North

    Such widescale damage is unlikely in the Adirondacks and New England forests because white pines are the predominant pine species there, said Jeff Garnas, a forest ecologist at the University of New Hampshire who's not associated with the Dartmouth study. The southern pine beetle's primary targets are pitch pines, red pines and jack pines.
  • Mon, 06/04/2018

    Meet Your Milk at UNH Open Barn June 23

    The NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture and the Granite State Dairy Promotion invite the public to come “meet your milk” at the UNH Open Barn Saturday, June 23, 2018. The annual statewide event, which is free and open to the public, takes place at the UNH Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Tue, 05/29/2018

    Maine Forest Management Hampering Ability of Forests to Reap Climate Benefits

    Over the last 20 years, Maine’s forests have become younger and less dense. As a result, forests are not providing the most climate benefits that they could through carbon sequestration and storage. However, more carbon could be stored over the next 100 years with less frequent harvests of smaller amounts of wood from each acre.
  • Mon, 05/21/2018

    Andrea Jilling: Investigating the Plant-Microbe Relationship

    Andrea Jilling, who will graduate in 2019 with a doctorate in natural resources and Earth system sciences, conducted research with New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station scientist Dr. Stuart Grandy. Learn about why she chose UNH for her graduate studies, what she researches, and what she's gained from her research experience.
  • Sun, 05/20/2018

    Union Leader: UNH scientists develop method to estimate New England cottontail population

     Scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire say they have developed a method to estimate the abundance of New England cottontail populations. 
  • Mon, 05/14/2018

    UNH Scientists Develop Method to Estimate New England Cottontail Population

    Scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have developed a method to estimate the abundance of New England cottontail populations. The noninvasive method provides an important tool in the effort to conserve this region’s only native rabbit.
  • Mon, 05/14/2018

    Concord Monitor: How do you count cottontail rabbits when it’s hard to even find them?

    Scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have developed a method to estimate the abundance of New England cottontail populations. The noninvasive method provides an important tool in the effort to conserve this region’s only native rabbit, a state-endangered species in Maine and New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 05/14/2018

    Boston Globe: Researchers develop way to keep track of New England cottontail in effort to save them

    They’re rabbits, but they’re not multiplying. The New England cottontail, the region’s only native rabbit species, is in decline, and researchers from the University of New Hampshire recently identified a non-invasive method to more accurately count the rabbits and assess the status of the population. To do that, they’re using fecal pellets.
  • Thu, 05/10/2018

    Concord Monitor: A good seed: UNH researcher breeding new varieties of crops

    The names Smooth Operator, Naked Bear and Blonde Beauty may sound like song titles from the ’70s, but for University of New Hampshire plant genetics researcher Brent Loy, they are the affectionate names of his most recent work.
  • Thu, 05/10/2018

    Fosters: New squash, melon, pumpkin seeds bred at UNH

    Gardeners preparing to plant their fruits and vegetables have a number of new summer squash, melon and pumpkins options that were developed at the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire by a researcher who represents the longest continuous squash and pumpkin breeding program in North America.
  • Mon, 05/07/2018

    Just in Time for Planting Season: New Squash, Melon, and Pumpkin Seeds Developed at UNH Now Available

    Gardeners preparing to plant their fruits and vegetables have a number of new summer squash, melon and pumpkins to choose from this year that were developed at the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire by a researcher who represents the longest continuous squash and pumpkin breeding program in North America.
  • Mon, 05/07/2018

    Concord Monitor: Who needs CRISPR – UNH success shows plain old cross-breeding can modify plant genetics like crazy

    Gardeners preparing to plant their fruits and vegetables have a number of new summer squash, melon and pumpkins options that were developed at the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire by a researcher who represents the longest continuous squash and pumpkin breeding program in North America.
  • Sun, 05/06/2018

    Union Leader: UNH study sheds new light on saltmarsh sparrows

    In many bird species, females have the ability to control the sex of individual eggs. “This means that offspring sex ratios are not usually left to chance,” a University of New Hampshire news release states. “From an evolutionary standpoint, this can be very beneficial, as different circumstances may favor the success of sons versus daughters.” But researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station have found that saltmarsh sparrows do not appear to manipulate the sex of their offspring.
  • Mon, 04/30/2018

    UNH Research Finds Saltmarsh Sparrows Support Gender Equality

    Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station have found that unlike some other birds, Saltmarsh Sparrows do not appear to manipulate the sex of their offspring based on environmental or maternal conditions as might be expected based on evolutionary theory. 
  • Mon, 04/30/2018

    Concord Monitor: Unusually, saltmarsh sparrows don’t tweak the gender of their chicks

    In birds, females have the ability to control the sex of individual eggs; therefore, a mother may be able to choose whether she prefers each egg laid to be a male or female. From an evolutionary standpoint, this can be very beneficial, as different circumstances may favor the success of sons versus daughters. But researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have found that saltmarsh sparrows do not appear to manipulate the sex of their offspring based on environmental or maternal conditions as might be expected.