News & Events

  • Mon, 06/17/2019

    UNH Research Supports Granite State’s Native Bees

    At the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire, scientists are conducting research that not only assesses the state of our native bees but also developing ways that citizens can help support these important members of our ecological and agricultural communities.
  • Tue, 06/11/2019

    Morning Ag Clips: UNH hosts pollinator conservation field day July 30

    The field day “Connecting the Dots for Pollinator Conservation:  Wildflower Meadows and Pollinator Habitat” takes place from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the farm at 70 Spinney Lane, Durham. Whether you are a landowner, landscaper, gardener, farmer, concerned citizen or serve on a municipal board, land trust or other nonprofit, your actions and decisions are important to pollinator conservation. The event is free and open to the public.
  • Mon, 06/10/2019

    UNH Hosts Pollinator Conservation Research Field Day July 30

    Interested in creating a wildflower meadow to support New Hampshire’s native pollinators? Come and learn fun, effective, and beautiful ways to enhance your local habitat and bring back pollinators Tuesday, July 30, 2019, at the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station’s Woodman Horticultural Research Farm at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Thu, 06/06/2019

    Morning Ag Clips: Meet Your Milk at UNH Open Barn June 29

    The NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture and the Granite State Dairy Promotion invite the public to come “meet your milk” at the UNH Open Barn Saturday, June 29, 2019. The annual statewide event, which is free and open to the public, takes place at the UNH Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Mon, 06/03/2019

    Meet Your Milk at UNH Open Barn June 29

    The NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture and the Granite State Dairy Promotion invite the public to come “meet your milk” at the UNH Open Barn Saturday, June 29, 2019. The annual statewide event, which is free and open to the public, takes place at the UNH Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Mon, 06/03/2019

    THE ADDICTED GARDENER: Knotweed causes multiple problems

    Chad Hammer, a graduate student and researcher at the University of New Hampshire who has been traveling New England in search of knotweed, is one of the first people to study the plant’s environmental effects. 
  • Thu, 05/30/2019

    USDA Fresh From the Field: Experiment Station Researchers Develop Online Kiwiberry Production Guide for the Northeast

    Prospective kiwiberry growers in the Northeast now have a roadmap to help them grow this emerging specialty fruit crop. Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) have produced an online guide that provides in-depth, regionally relevant information.
  • Mon, 05/27/2019

    Haley Nolen: Understanding the Genetics of Disease Resistance in Plants

    Haley Nolen, who will graduate this summer with a master’s in genetics, conducted research with New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station scientists Dr. Tom Davis and Dr.
  • Wed, 05/22/2019

    Fosters: Farmers moving to more sustainable agriculture practices

    Self-reported data from the 2017 Census of Agriculture, released in April of this year, shows the number of acres of cropland under no-till practices increased by 147 percent from 2012 to 2017, from 1,908 acres to 4,714. Farmers report the number of acres under reduced-till practices also increased, from 4,145 acres to 5,535, or an increase of 34 percent. The number of acres of Granite State cropland under no-till or reduced-till practices (10,249 acres) now exceeds cropland under intensive tilling (8,868 acres). The number of acres under intensive tilling dropped from 13,429 to 8,868, or 34 percent.
  • Tue, 05/21/2019

    Morning Ag Clips: Ag census reveals N.H. farmers are going sustainable

    New Hampshire farmers are increasingly moving to more sustainable farming practices, with those adopting no-till, reduced-till, and cover crop practices dramatically increasing since 2012, according to the 2017 Census of Agriculture. The University of New Hampshire has conducted extensive research on these sustainable agriculture practices and worked to educate Northeast farmers about them.
  • Mon, 05/20/2019

    USDA Ag Census Reveals N.H. Farmers Moving to More Sustainable Agriculture Practices

    New Hampshire farmers are increasingly moving to more sustainable farming practices, with those adopting no-till, reduced-till, and cover crop practices dramatically increasing since 2012, according to the 2017 Census of Agriculture. The University of New Hampshire has conducted extensive research on these sustainable agriculture practices and worked to educate Northeast farmers about them.
  • Mon, 05/20/2019

    Ag is America: UNH Reveals the Secret Ingredient for Strong Calves

    A new study from the University of New Hampshire suggests feeding dairy cows the vitamin niacin before they give birth improves the quality of their colostrum. This is great news for the dairy industry. In New Hampshire alone, dairy farms account for $141 million in total output and more than $19 million in labor income. Across the U.S., there are about 51,500 dairy farms and 9 million dairy cows.
  • Wed, 05/15/2019

    USA Today: 'A lot of empty kindergarten rooms': US birth rate hit a 32-year low last year

    The birth rate in the United States hit a 32-year low last year as the number of babies born dropped for the fourth straight year, federal health officials said in a report released Wednesday. New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station researcher Ken Johnson comments.
  • Mon, 05/13/2019

    American Population Shrinking in More Than a Third of Rural Counties

    Nearly 35 percent of rural counties in the United States are experiencing protracted and significant population loss, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire. Those counties now are home to 6.2 million residents, a third fewer than lived there in 1950.
  • Thu, 05/09/2019

    Slate: Oh, No, Not Knotweed!

    “When you’re working in a stream after a high-flow event, you’re very frequently seeing Japanese knotweed stems floating past you. They land somewhere else, and they start a new colony over there.” -- Chad Hammer, graduate student in the UNH College of Life Sciences and Agriculture whose research on Japanese knotweed was supported by the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station.
  • Wed, 05/08/2019

    Science Daily: New strain of canine distemper in wild animals in NH, VT

    A distinct strain of canine distemper virus, which is a widespread virus of importance to wildlife and domesticated dogs, has been identified in wild animals in New Hampshire and Vermont, according to pathologists.
  • Mon, 05/06/2019

    UNH Researchers Discover New Strain of Canine Distemper Virus in Wild Animals in NH, VT

    A distinct strain of canine distemper virus, which is a widespread virus of importance to wildlife and domesticated dogs, has been identified in wild animals in New Hampshire and Vermont, according to pathologists with New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Lab at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Tue, 04/30/2019

    Fresh Plaza: Ag Census reveals first reports of kiwiberry production in Northeast

    For the first time since the USDA began keeping statistics in 1840, farmers from several Northeast states are reporting kiwifruit production operations. The news comes six years after the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire launched a kiwiberry research and breeding program at the experiment station’s Woodman Horticultural Research Farm in Durham.
  • Mon, 04/29/2019

    Concord Monitor: Apples? Maple syrup? How old-fashioned: It’s kiwiberries for New Hampshire!

    For the first time since the USDA began keeping statistics in 1840, farmers from several Northeast states, including New Hampshire, are reporting kiwifruit production operations. The news comes six years after the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire launched a kiwiberry research and breeding program.
  • Visitors learn about kiwiberries at the 2018 Under the Vines field day at the UNH Woodman Horticultural Research Farm.
    Mon, 04/29/2019

    Ag Census Reveals First Reports of Kiwiberry Production in the Northeast

    For the first time since the USDA began keeping statistics in 1840, farmers from several Northeast states, including New Hampshire, are reporting kiwifruit production operations. The news comes six years after the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire launched a kiwiberry research and breeding program at the experiment station’s Woodman Horticultural Research Farm in Durham.
  • Thu, 04/25/2019

    WCVB: Enhancing water quality with oysters

    Oysters are critical to the health of Great Bay. Recycled oyster shells give new oysters a bed to grow on and new oysters are crucial to the Great Bay because just one adult oyster can filter 50 gallons of water a day.
  • Tue, 04/23/2019

    Boston Globe: N.H. study finds 14 local bee species on the decline

    Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that 14 local bee species are declining dramatically, and they’re pointing the finger at climate change.
  • Eastern Newt.
    Mon, 04/22/2019

    Every Day is Earth Day at the NH Agricultural Experiment Station

    Earth Day may come just once a year, but for scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire, every day is Earth Day. Experiment station scientists work year-round conducting leading ecological research that helps sustain the state and region’s natural resources and environment.
  • Thu, 04/18/2019

    Washington Post: Wild bee species critical to pollination on the decline

    More than a dozen wild bee species critical to pollinating everything from blueberries to apples in New England are on the decline, according to a new study from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station.