News & Events

  • Wed, 05/27/2020

    Morning Ag Clips: UNH researchers track success of New England cottontail reintroduction

    “We learned that captively reared New England cottontails released in the wild bred successfully, as did their wild-born offspring. This led to growth of the population and subsequent dispersal of individuals to a nearby patch about 700 meters away. This is an important measure of success, given the low documented dispersal rates in the wild,” said experiment station researcher Adrienne Kovach, associate professor in the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment.
  • Wed, 05/27/2020

    Concord Monitor: Released cottontails thrived, but it takes lots of releases

    The reintroduction by wildlife biologists at New Hampshire Fish & Game and the New England Cottontail Conservation Initiative in Bellamy River Wildlife Management Area was the first attempt at releasing captively bred New England cottontails into the wild.
  • Tue, 05/26/2020

    UNH Researchers Track Success of New England Cottontail Reintroduction

    Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have been monitoring an effort to reintroduce New England cottontails raised in captivity into the wild. Using DNA to track the survival and reproduction of the rabbits, the researchers found the reintroduced rabbits survived and bred in the wild over multiple years.
  • Tue, 05/26/2020

    Fosters: UNH Veterinary Diagnostic Lab safeguarding animal and public health

    As the world continues to focus on responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, pathologists and personnel at the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire continue to safeguard animal and public health. The lab provides timely diagnosis of animal diseases and remains on constant lookout for emerging and foreign animal diseases that could further threaten agriculture or public health.
  • Fri, 05/22/2020

    WMUR: Veterinary Diagnostic Lab continues operations during stay-at-home order

    Animal health needs haven't stopped because of the pandemic, and the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Lab at the University of New Hampshire is almost as busy as ever.
  • Mon, 05/18/2020

    UNH Veterinary Diagnostic Lab Safeguarding Animal and Public Health in State, Region

    As the world continues to focus on responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, New Hampshire should not let its guard down about additional diseases of potential importance to the state and nation. Pathologists and personnel at the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at UNH continue to safeguard animal and public health by delivering essential services to the state and region. 
  • Tue, 05/12/2020

    Seacoast Online: UNH scientists measure ecological impact of hurricanes

    Large, extreme storms such as hurricanes, superstorms, typhoons and tropical cyclones are becoming more frequent worldwide under a changing climate. With colleagues around the nation and world, University of New Hampshire researchers have developed a way to assess the short-term and long-term ecological repercussions of major hurricanes, including how large storms affect watersheds, streams and river networks.
  • Mon, 05/11/2020

    UNH Scientists Develop Approach to Measure Ecological Impact of Hurricanes

    With colleagues around the nation and world, University of New Hampshire researchers have developed a way to assess the short-term and long-term ecological repercussions of major hurricanes, including how large storms affect watersheds, streams, and river networks. It allows scientists to compare various ecological responses in systems as diverse as coastal bays and forested watersheds.
  • Mon, 05/04/2020

    Are Rivers the Livers of Watersheds?

    Wilfred Wollheim, associate professor of natural resources and the environment, presents “Are Rivers the Livers of Watersheds? River Network Capacity to Remove Nutrient Pollution,” at the 2020 Farm, Forest, and Garden Expo.
  • Wed, 04/29/2020

    Morning Ag Clips: UNH ecologist named ecological Society of America fellow

    A lifelong appointment, Frey was elected for “substantial contributions to our understanding of how soil organisms respond to environmental change and in turn impact the services that ecosystems provide across both space and time, leadership within the field of ecology, service to the Ecological Society of America, and tireless mentorship of the next generation of ecologists.”
  • Tue, 04/28/2020

    Adirondack Explorer: Stoking the home fires with pellets

    Wood-fired heaters create local jobs. Can they fight climate change, too?
  • Mon, 04/27/2020

    UNH Ecologist Named Ecological Society of America Fellow

    Serita Frey, professor of soil microbial ecology at the University of New Hampshire and a researcher with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, has been named a fellow by the Ecological Society of America.
  • Mon, 04/20/2020

    Paging UNH Alum Dr. Tim Marquis, '15

    Tim Marquis graduated with his bachelor’s degree in biomedical science from the UNH College of Life Sciences and Agriculture in 2015, and will complete medical school at the University of Connecticut this May. While he was an undergraduate, he conducted research at the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station with Dr. Stacia Sower, professor emerita of molecular, cellular, and biomedical sciences, discovering a novel pituitary cell type in the lamprey. He credits his work with her and her mentorship with providing him the personal and professional qualities necessary for him to perform high-quality research in a world-class environment. As he fininishes medical school during the COVID-19 pandemic and prepares to start his residency at Yale, we asked him what the last few months have been like. Here is what he told us.
  • Wed, 04/15/2020

    Union Leader: With eastern spruce budworm outbreak looming, UNH researchers provide guidance

    Researchers at the University of New Hampshire are providing guidance for landowners and government leaders with the expectation that the next major eastern spruce budworm outbreak will likely hit forests in the northeastern United States within the next few years.
  • Tue, 04/14/2020

    Morning Ag Clips: UNH researchers provide guidance for Eastern Spruce Budworm

    “Outbreaks from non-native insects such as the emerald ash borer threaten New Hampshire’s forests with widespread loss of native ash trees. Native insects such as the eastern spruce budworm with population cycles that boom every 30 to 40 years also are due again soon throughout the Northern Forest region,” said John Gunn, research assistant professor of forest management at the University of New Hampshire and researcher with the NH Agricultural Experiment Station.
  • Mon, 04/13/2020

    Long-Term Greenhouse Gas Benefits from Salvaging Dead Trees Balance Short-Term Excess Emissions

    The next major eastern spruce budworm outbreak likely will hit Northeastern United States forests over the next few years, putting more than 11.4 million acres of forest and 94.8 million metric tons of stored carbon in spruce and balsam fir at risk. While salvaging these trees for energy or lumber increases carbon dioxide emissions in the short-term, New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station researchers have found that certain forest management practices result in long-term benefits that can balance these short-term setbacks.
  • Mon, 04/13/2020

    Seacoast Online: UNH research leads to new drinking water standard in Granite State

    “Armed with the facts, we were able to change the maximum contaminant level and can now work to truly and positively impact the health of our citizens,” said Thomas O’Donovan, New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services water division director.
  • Tue, 04/07/2020

    Concord Monitor: UNH research prodded state’s low arsenic standard in water

    New Hampshire adopted a new, lower drinking water standard for arsenic last year after University of New Hampshire researchers found Granite Staters would be willing to invest in water treatment infrastructure improvements to the health effects.
  • Tue, 04/07/2020

    Greenhouse Grower: New Hampshire Researchers Studying Cold-Hardy Hydrangeas

    University of New Hampshire (UNH) researchers have launched a new study that will evaluate plants from three cold-hardy hydrangea species for cut flower and landscape use.
  • Mon, 04/06/2020

    UNH Research Leads to New Drinking Water Standard in Granite State

    The state of New Hampshire has adopted a new, lower drinking water standard for arsenic after University of New Hampshire researchers found Granite Staters would be willing to invest in water treatment infrastructure improvements that make drinking water more safe and avoid the substantial negative health effects of high arsenic levels.
  • Tue, 03/31/2020

    Fosters: U.S. population growth shrinks to lowest level in 100 years

    In the United States, fewer births and more deaths reduced population growth to a 100-year low. New Hampshire is one of the few states that has experienced more deaths than births in the past several years, although it still is seeing modest population increases because of people moving to the state, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 03/30/2020

    U.S. Population Growth Shrinks to Lowest Level in 100 Years

    In the United States, fewer births and more deaths reduced population growth to a 100-year low. New Hampshire is one of the few states that has experienced more deaths than births in the past several years, although it still is seeing modest population increases because of people moving to the state.
  • Thu, 03/26/2020

    New York Times: U.S. Population Grows at Slowest Rate Since 1919

    "If this epidemic is as significant as some think, we could have deaths exceeding births in the nation as a whole, which has never happened in the history of this country," said New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station researcher Kenneth Johnson, a demographer at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 03/23/2020

    A History of Responding to Our Nation's Crises

    More than 130 years ago, Congress established the nation’s state agricultural experiment station system. Throughout history, these public research organizations, most at land-grant state universities such as the University of New Hampshire, have addressed the most pressing agricultural and natural resources problems of the day.