News & Events

  • Mon, 08/13/2018

    Early-Season Heating Shows Promise Boosting Ginger Harvest

    For the relatively new crop known as “baby ginger,” delaying the harvest date increases yields in New Hampshire, according to preliminary research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire. 
  • Mon, 08/13/2018

    Morning Ag Clips: Early-season heat may boost ginger harvest

    For the relatively new crop known as “baby ginger,” delaying the harvest date increases yields in New Hampshire, according to preliminary research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Tue, 08/07/2018

    Morning Ag Clips: UNH earns Quality Milk Award from Dairy One

    he Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center and the Organic Dairy Research Farm, both facilities of the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire, have been awarded a 2017 Quality Milk Award from the nationally recognized nonprofit dairy farmers cooperative Dairy One. Less than 20 percent of Dairy One’s member herds received the designation in 2017.
  • Mon, 08/06/2018

    UNH Dairies Receive 2017 Quality Milk Award from Dairy One

    The Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center and the Organic Dairy Research Farm, both facilities of the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire, have been awarded a 2017 Quality Milk Award from the nationally recognized nonprofit dairy farmers cooperative Dairy One. Less than 20 percent of Dairy One’s member herds received the designation in 2017.
  • Wed, 07/25/2018

    Eagle-Tribune: 800 miles of Merrimack watershed tainted by road salt

    Researchers at the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station studied how road salt application during the winter is impacting stream water quality throughout the year, as salt concentrations can be highest in the summer and can potentially harm freshwater plants, invertebrates, amphibians and fish.
  • Mon, 07/23/2018

    New England Streams Impacted by High Salt Concentrations

    University of New Hampshire researchers estimate that more than 10 percent of streams in the Merrimack River watershed, which covers areas of New Hampshire and Massachusetts, are impacted by high chloride concentrations as a result of road salt applied during winter. Salt concentrations can be highest in the summer, raising concerns about harm to freshwater plants, invertebrates, amphibians, and fish.
  • Mon, 07/16/2018

    Visit UNH Research Farms on 6th Annual Durham Farm Day Saturday Aug. 18

    Growers and the public are invited to visit two research farms at the University of New Hampshire on the 6th annual Durham Farm Day Saturday, Aug. 18. The Woodman Horticultural Research Farm and the Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center, both facilities of the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, will be open for free public tours.
  • Sun, 07/15/2018

    A Young Ag Scientist's Story

    New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station scientist Radhika Bartaula, a doctoral student in genetics in the UNH College of Life Sciences and Agriculture, recently attended the Basic Wheat Improvement Course at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center. Learn more about her inspiring story that brought her from Nepal to the University of New Hampshire in Durham to study stem rust, one of the most feared agricultural diseases in the world. 
  • Sat, 07/14/2018

    Valley News: Gardeners Gently Reshape Landscape to Promote Pollinators

    Heightened interest in bees has been building for a long time, according to Neal, a landscape horticultural specialist who, in addition to public outreach, has a half-appointment running pollinator plant experiments at the NH Agricultural Experiment Station in Durham, N.H.
  • Mon, 07/09/2018

    Kaitlyn Orde: Extending NH's Strawberry Growing Season

    Kaitlyn Orde, who graduated in May with a masters in agricultural sciences, conducted research with New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station scientist Dr. Becky Sideman. Learn about why she chose UNH for her graduate studies, what she researched, and what she's gained from her research experience.
  • Tue, 07/03/2018

    Morning Ag Clips: Custom wildflower mixes aid native pollinators

    “The interest in helping pollinators has been astounding. There are literally hundreds of pollinator gardens and habitats that have been installed in New Hampshire alone in the last few years,” experiment station researcher Cathy Neal said.
  • Echinacea
    Mon, 07/02/2018

    UNH Scientists Develop Wildflower Mixes and Strategies to Support State’s Native Pollinators

    Creating and enhancing pollinator habitat is of growing interest to Granite State land owners, property managers, farmers, and landscapers. As a result, New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station scientists have developed a list of the most beneficial wildflowers to plant to support the state’s native wild bees.
  • Mon, 07/02/2018

    Concord Monitor: If you want to help pollinators in New Hampshire, what should you plant?

    Scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have developed a list of the most beneficial wildflowers to plant to support the state’s native wild bees in response to the interest of Granite State land owners, property managers, farmers, and landscapers.
  • Mon, 06/25/2018

    Is New Hampshire the Center of the Leafhopper Universe?

    Granite Staters sometimes quip that New Hampshire is the Center of the Universe, but is it also the center of the leafhopper universe? Three decades of research by scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire show that the state has more than 600 species of leafhoppers, or Cicadellidae, clearly surpassing the next largest family of insects documented in the UNH Insect Collection. 
  • Mon, 06/25/2018

    Union Leader: UNH scientists experiment with drones to collect forestry data

    Scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire recently analyzed the effectiveness of unmanned aerial systems to collect forestry data to assess ecological changes of forests and land cover.
  • Mon, 06/25/2018

    Portsmouth Herald: Celebrate the strawberry at festivals around the Seacoast

    Is this year a good one for strawberries? Experiment station researcher Becky Sideman said that although there were some cold weeks at the start of the growing season, strawberry crops had not encountered any “major setbacks” this year. New England weather makes this a challenging region for strawberry farmers, Sideman said, “because we have weather that makes it tricky, in some seasons, to get a good crop. When you have a lot of rainfall and/or hail events during flowering and fruiting, that can dramatically reduce yields.”
  • Mon, 06/25/2018

    Concord Monitor: Welcome to The Leafhopper State!

    Granite Staters sometimes quip that New Hampshire is the center of the universe, but is it also the center of the leafhopper universe? Three decades of research by scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire show that the state has more than 600 species of leafhoppers, or Cicadellidae, clearly surpassing the next largest family of insects documented in the UNH Insect Collection.
  • Fri, 06/22/2018

    NHPR: Something Wild: What Happens to Trees in Drought?

    Times of drought can present problems for trees, but it depends on the type of tree. Heidi Asbjornsen, a professor of ecosystem ecology at the University of New Hampshire, has been making close study of the effects of drought on trees, which will prove useful data to have, as she says “Climate change forecast suggests that in the future, although we’ll likely experience more total rainfall, we’re also expected to see more frequent and severe droughts.”
  • Mon, 06/18/2018

    UNH Scientists Analyze Effectiveness of Unmanned Aerial Systems to Map Seacoast Forests

    The collection of imagery from Unmanned Aerial Systems offer scientists novel methods and strategies to assess ecological changes of forests and land cover. However, their rapid extension into new disciplines brings with it a necessity to understand data quality of the respective products. Scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire recently analyzed effectiveness of Unmanned Aerial Systems to collect meaningful forestry data, which is key for making informed environmental policy decisions.
  • Wed, 06/13/2018

    Morning Ag Clips: 2018 New England Bee Bioblitz

    New England bee enthusiasts will head to Cheshire County in mass for the 2018 Annual New England Bee Bioblitz organized by the University of New Hampshire Bee Lab and supported by the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station. The event takes place at Pisgah State Park June 22-24, 2018, and is free and open to the public.
  • Mon, 06/11/2018

    UNH Bee Lab Hosts 2018 New England Bee Bioblitz in Cheshire County June 22-24

    New England bee enthusiasts will head to Cheshire County in mass for the 2018 Annual New England Bee Bioblitz organized by the University of New Hampshire Bee Lab and supported by the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station. The event takes place at Pisgah State Park June 22-24, 2018, and is free and open to the public.
  • Mon, 06/11/2018

    ABC News: Pine-killing southern beetle may be more deadly in North

    A beetle that has killed millions of acres of pines in southern forests is munching its way north, and new research suggests its tree-killing prowess could be magnified in cooler climes.
  • Mon, 06/11/2018

    New York Times: Pine-Killing Southern Beetle May Be More Deadly in North

    Such widescale damage is unlikely in the Adirondacks and New England forests because white pines are the predominant pine species there, said Jeff Garnas, a forest ecologist at the University of New Hampshire who's not associated with the Dartmouth study. The southern pine beetle's primary targets are pitch pines, red pines and jack pines.
  • Mon, 06/04/2018

    Meet Your Milk at UNH Open Barn June 23

    The NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture and the Granite State Dairy Promotion invite the public to come “meet your milk” at the UNH Open Barn Saturday, June 23, 2018. The annual statewide event, which is free and open to the public, takes place at the UNH Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Tue, 05/29/2018

    Maine Forest Management Hampering Ability of Forests to Reap Climate Benefits

    Over the last 20 years, Maine’s forests have become younger and less dense. As a result, forests are not providing the most climate benefits that they could through carbon sequestration and storage. However, more carbon could be stored over the next 100 years with less frequent harvests of smaller amounts of wood from each acre.