News & Events

  • Wed, 04/18/2018

    Washington Post: Parasite transmitted by ticks found in Canada lynx

    The Canada lynx, listed as a threatened species by the federal government, may have one more thing to worry about. University of New Hampshire scientists on Monday announced they have discovered a previously undiagnosed parasite transmitted by ticks as well as a virus in the medium-sized cat known for its long ears. The virus is similar to the Epstein-Barr virus that causes mononucleosis in humans and is related to a virus that infects domestic cats.
  • Mon, 04/16/2018

    NH Veterinary Diagnostic Lab Discovers Previously Unknown Parasite, Virus in Canada Lynx

    Scientists with the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire have discovered a previously undiagnosed parasite and virus in the Canada Lynx. The parasite, transmitted by ticks, is a known to infect domestic dogs. The virus is similar to the Epstein-Barr virus that causes mononucleosis in humans and is related to a virus that infects domestic cats.
  • Tue, 04/10/2018

    Union Leader: New England's white pines being damaged by disease

    White pine needle damage is being accelerated by the region’s warmer, wetter springs and is affecting the growth and health of New England’s eastern white pines, according to research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 04/09/2018

    Will Hastings: Caring for UNH's Kiwiberry Vineyard

    Contoocook resident Will Hastings, who will graduate this May with a master’s in biology, agricultural sciences, conducted research with New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station scientist Dr. Iago Hale. Learn about why he chose UNH for his graduate studies, what he researched, and what he's gained from his research experience.
  • Fri, 04/06/2018

    Morning Ag Clips: The impact of White Pine Needle Damage

    White Pine Needle Damage, a complex of foliar diseases that is being accelerated by the region’s warmer, wetter springs, is slowing the growth and hampering the health of New England’s eastern white pines, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Cameron McItnire
    Mon, 04/02/2018

    White Pine Needle Damage Slowing Growth, Hampering Health of Region’s Trees

    White Pine Needle Damage, a complex of foliar diseases that is being accelerated by the region’s warmer, wetter springs, is slowing the growth and hampering the health of the region’s eastern white pines, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 04/02/2018

    Concord Monitor: In warmer climates, a native fungus becomes a threat to white pine

    “This new disease impacts one of New Hampshire’s most widespread and economically important tree species,” said Heidi Asbjornsen, associate professor of natural resources and the environment and researcher with the NH Agricultural Experiment Station. “Eastern white pine composes more than 500,000 acres of New Hampshire forest land. Of the estimated 30 billion board feet of saw timber, 31 percent is white pine.”
  • Rory Carroll
    Mon, 03/26/2018

    Rory Carroll: Investigating NH’s Charismatic Predator, the Bobcat

    Rory Carroll, who will graduate in May 2019 with a PhD in wildlife and conservation biology, has conducted extensive research about the state’s bobcat population with New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station scientist Dr. Marian Litvaitis. Learn about why he chose UNH for his graduate studies, what he researched, and what he's gained from his research experience.
  • Tue, 03/20/2018

    Union Leader: UNH to hold greenhouse open house

    The University of New Hampshire Greenhouse Open House will be held at the Macfarlane Research Greenhouses on Friday and Saturday. The greenhouses will be open from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. both days. The event is free and open to the public.
  • Mon, 03/19/2018

    UNH Alum Returns Home for Pathology Externship at NH Veterinary Diagnostic Lab

    Jackie Marinoff’s dream of becoming a veterinarian has taken her far from the University of New Hampshire since she graduated in 2013 with her undergraduate degree in equine studies/pre-veterinary medicine. Recently she recently returned to campus for an intense, three-week pathology externship at the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Lab (NHVDL). 
  • Thu, 03/15/2018

    Laconia Sun: UNH Researchers Study Effects of Warmer, Snow-Free Winters

     New England’s warmer, snow-free winters may increase carbon dioxide losses in forests, where deciduous trees can’t take advantage of warm temperatures before their leaves emerge. However, farms cultivating grasses have a greater potential to start growing in the winter “dormant season,” perhaps partially offsetting the increasing winter carbon losses from forests, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 03/12/2018

    UNH Hosts Greenhouse Open House March 23-24

    Come learn about home gardening, landscaping, current research, and other growing information at the University of New Hampshire Greenhouse Open House at the Macfarlane Research Greenhouses Friday, March 23, and Saturday, March 24, 2018. The greenhouses will be open from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. both days. The event is free and open to the public.
  • Wed, 03/07/2018

    Union Leader: UNH scientists join effort to identify most common weeds

    Scientists sampled weed seedbanks and measured soil physical and chemical characteristics on 77 organic farms across the region. They found temperature-related variables such as latitude, longitude, and mean maximum and minimum temperature were the strongest and most consistent correlates with weed seedbank composition, the news release states.
  • Tue, 03/06/2018

    Morning Ag Clips: Most prevalent weeds on organic vegetable farms

    This research was funded by the Northern New England Collaborative Research Funding Program, a partnership of the Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Station, New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, and the Vermont Agricultural Experiment Station. The three station directors initiated the program with a goal to catalyze coordinated research on high-priority needs for the Northern New England region in experiment station mission areas, of significant importance across the three states. A second objective was to incentivize faculty at the three institutions to explore opportunities for ongoing cross-institutional research synergies.
  • Tue, 03/06/2018

    NHPR: Warmer Winters Negatively Impact Tourism and Forest Health

    In recent years, unreliable snow cover and wild temperature swings have caused headaches for our winter recreation industry, and all those who love to ski, ice-fish, or snowmobile.  But the impacts go beyond disappointment: there are animal and forest health affects as well, including the beloved Sugar maple. 
  • Mon, 03/05/2018

    Fosters: UNH scientists help ID emerging, problematic weeds

    “We are living in a period of rapid and to some extent unpredictable environmental change, brought about by a variety of natural and human-mediated factors, including climate change, production practices, technological advances, and others. The purpose of this project was to establish a baseline assessment of the weed problems facing organic vegetable growers in the Northern New England region as a basis for detecting and predicting the evolutionary emergence of new, problematic weeds,” said New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station researcher Dr. Tom Davis, professor of genetics at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 03/05/2018

    Northern New England Scientists Identify Most Prevalent Weeds on Region’s Organic Vegetable Farms

    Scientists from Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont have completed the first comprehensive assessment of weeds found on organic vegetable farms in Northern New England. The collaborative, three-state study is an important first step in providing a baseline for organic growers who could face challenges providing locally grown produce because of new, problematic weeds emerging due to environmental change.
  • Thu, 03/01/2018

    Union Leader: UNH researchers study effect of warmer, snowless winters

    New England’s warmer, snow-free winters may increase carbon dioxide losses in forests, where deciduous trees can’t take advantage of warm temperatures before their leaves emerge, according to University of New Hampshire researchers. 
  • Wed, 02/28/2018

    Morning Ag Clips: Impact of warmer, snow-free winters

    “Changes in winter climate, such as warmer air temperatures and less snow cover, can influence plant and soils in the following growing season. A better understanding of how winter weather affects ecosystems will help us predict whether our ecosystems will exacerbate or mitigate climate change by taking up or removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.” -- Rebecca Sanders-DeMott
  • Wed, 02/28/2018

    NHPR: UNH Climate Research: Less Snow Hurts Economies & Environment

    New studies say a decrease in snow days as the climate changes is taking an economic toll on states like New Hampshire—as well as an environmental one.
  • Mon, 02/26/2018

    Warmer, Snow-Free Winters May Increase Carbon Dioxide Losses in Forests, Gains on Farms

    New England’s warmer, snow-free winters may increase carbon dioxide losses in forests, where deciduous trees can’t take advantage of warm temperatures before their leaves emerge. However, farms cultivating grasses have a greater potential to start growing in the winter “dormant season,” perhaps partially offsetting the increasing winter carbon losses from forests, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station.
  • Tue, 02/20/2018

    Morning Ag Clips: Fungal disease a concern for small grain growers

    Stem rust is one of the most feared agricultural diseases in the world, infecting wheat and other cereal crops. The fungal pathogen is capable of severe epidemics, thus presenting a threat to the global food supply. In New England, the disease is a concern in light of the region’s re-emerging small grain industry.
  • Tue, 02/20/2018

    Concord Monitor: The largest plant eradication effort in U.S. history tried to halt stem rust; UNH is working on it, too

    Scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire are trying to understand the potential risk of the disease spreading and, perhaps even more importantly, evolving greater virulence in the region. Long term, they also hope to contribute to a genetic solution that reduces global yield losses to the disease.
  • Mon, 02/19/2018

    Preventing the Stem Rust-Barberry Relationship that Causes Heartbreak for Cereal Crops

    Stem rust is one of the most feared agricultural diseases in the world, infecting wheat and other cereal crops. The fungal pathogen is capable of severe epidemics, thus presenting a threat to the global food supply. In New England, the disease is a concern in light of the region’s re-emerging small grain industry.
  • Thu, 02/15/2018

    NHPR: EPA Chief Signals Push To Declare Wood Energy Carbon-Neutral On N.H. Visit

    NHAES researcher Dr. John Gunn says the polluting effects of burning wood are complex, and hinge on the kind and amount of material harvested, how it’s used, and what fuel it replaces. "If you're talking about, truly, residues from sawmills or the tops and limbs that were left over from harvest anyway, those have very good greenhouse gas emissions profiles compared to other scenarios where you're harvesting whole trees specifically for biomass energy uses, and those trees could have remained standing. That all matters in terms of the outcome, in terms of whether or not making energy from wood is better for the atmosphere than making energy from a fossil fuel.”