Leed Gold Certification

James Hall Restoration

James Hall reopened in January after an environmentally friendly renovation and is the first LEED Gold (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), certified building on campus. The renovation increased the building's size by 14,000 square feet, using 75% of the existing exterior walls, floors and roof. Historic architectural elements of the building were salvaged and restored, maintaining the character of the building.

  • Four story historic staircase, brass hand rails and light fixtures 
  • Built-in-millwork bench seating
  • Yellow brick walls and wainscoting
  • Terrazzo floors
  • Hitchcock map

Sustainable innovations in James Hall include a gray water system that captures rainwater from the building’s roof and gutters for use in toilets; daylight harvesting, which utilizes motion sensors to turn off electrical fixtures when natural daylight provides adequate light; and a heat wheel recovery system, which makes the air handling unit extremely efficient. Chilled beam technology is used to condition or regulate the temperature throughout the building, proving to be more efficient in utilizing less electrical energy of conditioned air required to meet the same thermal load.

The James Hall renovation included a “green” roof that utilizes plantings to clean and conserve water; an outdoor “classroom” featuring a slate chalkboard from the original building; and an 1878 wooden New Hampshire geological relief map by Charles Hitchcock, restored by Professor Emeritus of geology Wally Bothner.

James Hall Restoration

James Hall reopened in January after an environmentally friendly renovation and is the first LEED Gold (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), certified building on campus. The renovation increased the building's size by 14,000 square feet, using 75% of the existing exterior walls, floors and roof. Historic architectural elements of the building were salvaged and restored, maintaining the character of the building.

  • Four story historic staircase, brass hand rails and light fixtures 
  • Built-in-millwork bench seating
  • Yellow brick walls and wainscoting
  • Terrazzo floors
  • Hitchcock map

Sustainable innovations in James Hall include a gray water system that captures rainwater from the building’s roof and gutters for use in toilets; daylight harvesting, which utilizes motion sensors to turn off electrical fixtures when natural daylight provides adequate light; and a heat wheel recovery system, which makes the air handling unit extremely efficient. Chilled beam technology is used to condition or regulate the temperature throughout the building, proving to be more efficient in utilizing less electrical energy of conditioned air required to meet the same thermal load.

The James Hall renovation included a “green” roof that utilizes plantings to clean and conserve water; an outdoor “classroom” featuring a slate chalkboard from the original building; and an 1878 wooden New Hampshire geological relief map by Charles Hitchcock, restored by Professor Emeritus of geology Wally Bothner. 

James Hall Restoration

James Hall reopened in January after an environmentally friendly renovation and is the first LEED Gold (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), certified building on campus. The renovation increased the building's size by 14,000 square feet, using 75% of the existing exterior walls, floors and roof. Historic architectural elements of the building were salvaged and restored, maintaining the character of the building.

  • Four story historic staircase, brass hand rails and light fixtures 
  • Built-in-millwork bench seating
  • Yellow brick walls and wainscoting
  • Terrazzo floors
  • Hitchcock map

Sustainable innovations in James Hall include a gray water system that captures rainwater from the building’s roof and gutters for use in toilets; daylight harvesting, which utilizes motion sensors to turn off electrical fixtures when natural daylight provides adequate light; and a heat wheel recovery system, which makes the air handling unit extremely efficient. Chilled beam technology is used to condition or regulate the temperature throughout the building, proving to be more efficient in utilizing less electrical energy of conditioned air required to meet the same thermal load.

The James Hall renovation included a “green” roof that utilizes plantings to clean and conserve water; an outdoor “classroom” featuring a slate chalkboard from the original building; and an 1878 wooden New Hampshire geological relief map by Charles Hitchcock, restored by Professor Emeritus of geology Wally Bothner.