Graduate Degree Courses

Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences

MCBS 901 - Introduction to Research in the Life Sciences
Credits: 2.00
This two-credit graduate course is designed to acquaint first-year master's and doctoral students with facilities and tools for designing, conducting, and communicating research. Topics include: acquiring proper background information; the art of oral presentation; effective writing; data analysis and graphics using computers; ethics in science; and issues in research.

 

MCBS 905 - Contemporary Topics in Molecular, Cellular and Biomedical Sciences
Credits: 1.00
Presentation, discussion, and critical evaluation of currnt research literature in molecular/cellular life sciences and in biomedical sciences. Topics will vary each semester. May be repeated for a maximum of 5 credits. Cr/F.

 

MCBS 913 - Applied Bioinformatics
Credits: 3.00

Genome-enabled biology is the exploration of basic biological questions by combining high-throughput data gathering approaches, such as DNA sequencing, with computational skills in the area of Bioinformatics. Course is designed to provide an opportunity for graduate students in the life sciences to develop sophisticated methods of data analysis by participating in a collaborative project. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

MCBS 995 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Special topics course.

MCBS 996 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Special topics course.

MCBS 997 - Seminar
Credits: 1.00
Graduate student and faculty presentations on current topics in the molecular life sciences and biomedical sciences. Graduate students are expected to present one seminar per year and attend all seminars each semester. May be repeated. Cr/F. (Offered both fall and spring).

Animal Science

ANSC 801 - Physiology of Reproduction
Credits: 4.00
Comparative aspects of embryology, anatomy, endocrinology, and physiology of reproduction. Special fee. Lab.

ANSC 808 - Ruminant Nutritional Physiology
Credits: 3.00
Anatomy of the ruminant gastrointestinal tract, physiological factors related to rumen function, and microbial and whole-body metabolism of carbohydrates, protein, and lipids. Prereq: general microbiology or equivalent.

ANSC 810 - Dairy Nutrition
Credits: 4.00
Feeding and related management of dairy cows, nutrients and their use, digestive anatomy, physiology, energy systems, forage quality and conservation methods, metabolic disorders, ration balancing. Prereq: principles of nutrition; nutritional biochemistry or equivalent, permission.

ANSC 814 - Research Methods in Endocrinology
Credits: 5.00
Principles of biochemical, cellular and molecular techniques and their applications to research in the endocrine system. Techniques include protein and nucleic acid assays, thin layer chromatography, radioimmunoassay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transfection, restriction analysis, plasmid amplification, RNA extraction, and dot-dot hybridization. Seven lab reports required. Prereq: physiology of reproduction or general biochemistry or endocrinology; permission. Special fee. Lab.

ANSC 815 - Physiology of Lactation
Credits: 4.00
Examines the biological and biochemical influences of the lactation process. Emphasis on the physiological effects of environments, hormones, and nutrition on milk synthesis and secretion, mammary physiology, and maternal response. Prereq: physiology of reproduction, permission.

ANSC 818 - Mammalian Physiology
Credits: 4.00
Advanced study of the systems that control mammalian functions with emphasis on cellular and molecular mechanisms. Includes the nervous, muscular, cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal, and endocrine systems. Prereq: human anatomy and physiology, principles of animal physiology, one semester of biochemistry, or permission.

ANSC 824 - Reproductive Management and Artificial Insemination
Credits: 4.00
Focus on goals and fundamentals of reproductive management of horses, dairy and livestock animals, and, through experience, development of competency in performing modern breeding techniques for equine or bovine reproduction. Prereq: physiology of reproduction and permission. Special fee. Lab.

ANSC 827 - Advanced Dairy Management I
Credits: 4.00
Advanced management evaluation of milking procedures, reproduction, nutrition, mastitis, and calf and heifer management. Prereq: principles of nutrition, permission.

ANSC 828 - Advanced Dairy Management II
Credits: 4.00
Advanced management evaluation of dairy cattle, housing milking equipment, milk quality, record keeping, herd health, financial, personnel management, environmental issues. Visits to farms in the area to provide critical assessments of dairy farm businesses. Prereq: advanced dairy management I, permission.

ANSC 853 - Cell Culture
Credits: 5.00
Principles and technical skills fundamental to the culture of animal and plant cells, tissues and organs. Introduction to the techniques of subculturing, establishing primary cultures, karyotyping, serum testing, cloning, growth curves, cryopreservation, hybridoma formation and monoclonal antibody production, and organ cultures. An interdisciplinary course with emphasis on the application of cell culture to contemporary research in the biological sciences. Prereq: general microbiology; permission. (Also offered as MICR 851 and PBIO 851.) Lab.

ANSC 895 - Investigations
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Investigations in genetics, nutrition, management, diseases, histology, equestrian management/agribusiness, physiology, cell biology, microbiology, dairy management, or teaching experience. May be repeated up to a maximum of 4 credits. Prereq: permission.

ANSC 899 - Master's Thesis
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
Master's students must enroll for a total of 6 credits of this course. Students may enroll in 1-6 credits per semester. Permission required. Cr/F.

ANSC 900 - Contemporary Topics in Animal, Nutritional, and Biomedical Sciences
Credits: 1.00
An informal forum for graduate students to gain experience in evaluating the current literature of a contemporary topic. (Also offered as NUTR 900.) May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. Offered both fall and spring semesters. Cr/F.

ANSC 902 - Philosophy of Research in the Life Sciences
Credits: 2.00
Designed to acquaint master's and doctoral students (second year and beyond) with the theories and principles for understanding, designing, conducting, and communicating research in the Life Sciences.

Readings and class discussions will focus on issues such as: What is research? How is it performed? How is validity determined? How are isolated findings integrated into a coherent system? What is the social context? Offered fall semester.

ANSC 913 - Contemporary Topics in Immunobiology
Credits: 2.00
Topical lectures, seminars, and assigned reading emphasizing recent advances in immunology. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. (Offered in alternate years.)

ANSC 995 - Non-thesis Investigations in Animal Science
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Advanced investigations in a research project, exclusive of thesis project. Elective only after consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. Offered both fall and spring semesters.

ANSC 999 - Doctoral Research
Credits: Cr/F.

Biochemistry

BCHM 802 - Endocrinology
Credits: 4.00
Biochemical and molecular structure and function of vertebrate endocrine systems. Influence of endocrine systems on the physiology of vertebrates, with special reference to mammals. Current investigations of the endocrine systems as a regulator and integrator of body functions including such systems as growth, reproduction, metabolism, differentiation, and behavior. Prereq: general biochemistry or principles of biochemistry;/ or permission. (Also offered as ANSC 802.) Special fee.

BCHM 850 - Physical Biochemistry
Credits: 3.00
Structure, interactions, and physical-chemical properties of biomolecules. Thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic methods for the study of proteins and nucleic acids. Prereq: 2 semesters organic chemistry, 1 semester of calculus;/ or permission.

BCHM 851 - Principles of Biochemistry I
Credits: 4.00
In-depth survey of biochemistry: macromolecule structure; structure and function of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. Prereq: organic chemistry, general biochemistry or permission.

BCHM 852 - Principles of Biochemistry II
Credits: 4.00
Continuation of in-depth survey of biochemistry: metabolism of amino acids, nucleotides, carbohydrates and lipids; macromolecules synthesis and regulation; molecular biology of the eukaryotic cell. Prereq: BCHM 851 or permission.

BCHM 854 - Laboratory in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Nucleic Acids
Credits: 5.00
Application of modern techniques to the analysis of biomolecules, with an emphasis on nucleic acids; includes DNA isolation and analysis, cloning and sequencing and analysis of gene products. Prereq: general biochemistry, principles of biochemistry or permission. (Also offered as GEN 854 and PBIO 854.) Special fee.

BCHM 863 - Biochemistry of Cancer
Credits: 3.00
Molecular mechanisms of viral and chemical carcinogenesis; role of ocogenes in normal cell growth, development, and differentiation. Biochemical basis of cancer chemotherapy. Critical reviews of research papers and an advanced research paper required. Prereq: general biochemistry or BCHM 851 or permission. Credit/Fail.

BCHM 883 - Proteomics for Biological Discoveries
Credits: 4.00
Proteomics is a cutting edge area of molecular biology that undertakes a systematic characterization of the entire set of proteins (proteome). This course develops an understanding on key technologies to study the expression levels, posttranslational modifications, cellular localization, three-dimensional structure, protein interactions, and dynamic changes of these properties during cellular processes. Topics to be covered include goals in proteomic analysis, major technology platforms, and pharmaceutical and biomedical applications.

BCHM 894 - Protein Structure and Function
Credits: 4.00
Analysis of how the three-dimensional architecture of soluble and membrane proteins contributes to their biochemical function. Topics include methods for determining the structure of proteins, protein folding, protein targeting, and mechanisms of enzyme catalysis. Computer resources will be used for protein modeling and structural prediction. Prereq: general biochemistry or principles of biochemistry.

BCHM 895 - Investigations
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Independent study in various areas including but not limited to: genetics, signal transduction, gene regulation, molecular evolution, biochemistry of cancer, biophysics of macromolecules, endocrinology, and glycobiology. May include readings, laboratory work, organized seminars and conferences. Prereq: permission. Not more than 4 total credit hours can be applied to BCHM or major electives.

BCHM 899 - Master's Thesis
Credits: 1.00 to 10.00
May be repeated to a maximum of 10 credits. Cr/F.

BCHM 960 - Advanced Topics in Signal Transduction
Credits: 3.00
Examination of current topics in signal transduction mechanisms. Pathways involving receptor activation, G-protein activation, regulation of effector enzymes, and changes in second messengers covered, along with mechanisms for short- and long-term desensitization of cellular responses.

BCHM 999 - Doctoral Research
Credits: Cr/F.

Genetics

GEN 804 - Genetics of Prokaryotic Microbes
Credits: 5.00
Expression and transfer of genetic elements (chromosomal and non-chromosomal) in prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms; consideration of factors influencing public health, industry, the environment, and society. Students earning credit for PBIO 754/854; BCHM 854/854; GEN 754/854 may not receive credit for MICR 704/804. Prereq: general microbiology; biochemistry (Also offered as MICR 804.) Lab. Special fee.

GEN 805 - Population and Quantitative Genetics
Credits: 4.00
An introduction to the theory and application of population and quantitative genetics. Exploration of the forces (mutation, selection, random drift, inbreeding, assortative mating) affecting the frequency and distribution of allelic variation in natural populations. Quantifying the structure of populations. Analysis of continuous variation in populations simultaneously at multiple loci, interactions between genes and their environment underlying phenotypic variation. Methods of analysis for theoretical and practical applications. Prereq: GEN 6 04; one semester of statistics and calculus recommended. Lab. (Not offered every year.)

GEN 806 - Human Genetics
Credits: 3.00
The genetic basis of human traits and diseases. New understanding added by molecular genetic approaches. Human genome project, gene therapy. Discussion of genetic components of quantitative and behavioral traits in human evolution. Prereq: BIOL 604 or ANSC 612. (Not offered every year.) (Also offered as ANSC 806.)

GEN 811 - Genomics and Bioinformatics
Credits: 4.00
The methods, applications, and implications of genomics--the analysis of whole genomes. Microbial, plant and animal genomics are addressed, as well as medical, ethical and legal implications. The lab provides exposure and experience of a range of bioinformatics approaches--the computer applications used in genome analysis. Prereq: BIOL 604 or equivalent. Lab. (Also listed as BCHM 811.)

GEN 812 - Introduction to Perl programming for Bioinformatics
Credits: 4.00
This first course in Perl programming is designed to enable undergraduate and graduate students in the life sciences to solve fundamental biological questions of simple to moderate complexity that require the use of computers to automate repetitive, exhaustive tasks and handle query results efficiently including: computing values of important parameters of biological sequence data, writing pattern search and motif discovery scripts, accessing, querying, manipulating, retrieving, parsing, analyzing and saving data from local and remote databases. Prereq: BIOL 604 or permission.

GEN 813 - Microbial Ecology and Evolution
Credits: 4.00
Functional roles of microorganisms, their population dynamics and interactions, and their mechanisms of evolutionary change in natural communities, laboratory experiments, and simple mathematical models. Special emphasis on the tempo and mode of prokaryotic adaptation, the evolution of virulence, and the origin of new pathogens. Prereq: General Microbiology (Also listed as MICR 813.) Special fee.

GEN 815 - Molecular Evolution
Credits: 4.00
Rates and patterns of evolutionary change in biomolecules. Forces affecting the size and structure of genomes. Molecular mechanisms of organismal evolution. Emphasis on integrating evidence from biochemistry, molecular genetics and organismal studies. Methods for reconstructing phylogeny from molecular sequences. Prereq: BIOL 604 or equivalent; some knowledge of statistics is recommended. Special fee. Lab. (Not offered every year.)

GEN 817 - Molecular Microbiology
Credits: 5.00

Fundamental physiological and metabolic processes of archaea bacteria and fungi with a strong emphasis on prokaryotes. Literature-based course. Topics include regulation and coordination of microbial metabolism, bacterial cell cycle, global control of gene expression, diversity of energy metabolism, and microbial cell differentiation. Prereq: general microbiology; principles of genetics; permission. Special fee. Lab.

GEN 871 - Molecular Genetics
Credits: 4.00
Structure, organization, replication, dynamics, and expression of genetic information in eukaryotes. Focus on molecular genetic mechanisms of gene expression and its control; molecular genetics methods; molecular genetic control of cell division and differentiation during development. Prereq: BCHM 658/659 or 751; BIOL 604 or equivalent;/or permission. (Also offered as BCHM 871.)

GEN 872 - Evolutionary Genetics of Plants
Credits: 4.00
Mechanisms of genetic change in plant evolution, domestication, breeding, and genetic engineering. Topics include Darwinian theory; speciation and hybridization; origins and co-evolution of nuclear and organelle genomes; gene and genome evolution; transposable elements, chromosome rearrangements, polypliody. Lab: DNA techniques, sequence analysis programs, phylgenetic trees. Special fee. Lab. Prereq: principles of genetics or equivalent; introductory botany or principles of biology I and II or equivalent. (Also offered as PBIO 872.) (Not offered every year.)

GEN 874 - Plant Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering
Credits: 3.00
Plant transformation and regeneration, gene isolation and identification, structure and regulation of plant genes, current applications of plant genetic engineering, environmental and social implications. Prereq: BIOL 604 or permission. (Also offered as PBIO 874.) (Not offered every year.)

GEN 875 - Plant Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering Lab
Credits: 2.00
Techniques for genetic transformation and selection of plants, analysis of foreign gene expression, and plant cell and tissue culture. Coreq: PBIO or GEN 874. (Also offered as PBIO 875.) Special fee. (Not offered every year.)
Co-requisites: GEN 874

GEN 895 - Special Topics
Credits: 2.00 to 4.00

GEN 899 - Master's Thesis
Credits: 1.00 to 10.00
May be repeated up to a maximum of 10 credits. Cr/F.

GEN 995 - Special Topics
Credits: 2.00 to 4.00
Intended for study in specialty areas not ordinarily included in other courses. May involve formal classes, discussions, or independent investigations. Prereq: permission.

GEN 996 - Special Topics
Credits: 2.00 to 4.00
See description for GEN 995.

GEN 999 - Doctoral Research
Credits: Cr/F.

Microbiology

MICR 805 - Immunology
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to the major cellular and molecular components of the immune system; examination of their development wand production, their interactions with each other and with other systems in the body, and their regulation; exploration of their role in beneficial and harmful immune responses in humans and animals. Prereq: general microbiology. This course must be taken in conjunction with MICR 815 to receive major credit in Microbiology. Prereq: MICR 503.

MICR 806 - Virology
Credits: 3.00
Principles of animal and, in selected instances, plant and bacterial virology in relation to infection and disease. Emphasis on the molecular biology of viruses, viral replication, isolation, propagation, assay, pathogenesis, diagnosis, detection, epidemiology, and control. Prereq: BMS 503.
Co-requisites:

MICR 808 - Virology Laboratory
Credits: 2.00
Principles and practices of animal, selected plants, and bacterial virological methods for the propagation, detection, and enumeration of viruses. Prereq: BMS 503. Special fee.
Co-requisites: MICR 806

MICR 816 - Public Health and Waterborne Diseases 
Credits: 4.00
Course has three sections: 1) government, 2) disease and epidemiology, and 3) sources of anthropogenic (of human origin) microbial pollution, control and disinfection. The overall theme of the class is to understand how and why waterborne (virus, protozoal, and bacterial) and some food-borne diseases are still prevalent within our society. The class usually goes on at least two field trips, to a wastewater plant and a drinking water plant; at times students may be asked to go to town meetings or public hearings concerning water and pollution. In lab, students do experiments and then analyze their data and share it with the rest of the class by posting it on the class Web site. Prereq: BMS 503. Special fee.

MICR 895 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Advanced studies in specific areas. Prereq: permission. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 credits.

MICR 899 - Master's Thesis
Credits: 1.00 to 10.00
May be repeated up to a maximum of 10 credits. Cr/F.

MICR 905 - Current Topics
Credits: 1.00
Discussion of current developments in microbiology: A) Microbial Ecology; B) Immunology; C) Pathogenic Mechanisms; D) Microbial Genetics; E) Water-borne Diseases; F) Microbial Physiology. May be repeated. Cr/F.

MICRO 906 - Hot Topics
Credits: 1.00

Presentation and discussion of current literature in Microbiology. Required of all Microbiology graduate students. May be repeated for a maximum of 5 credits. Cr/F.

MICR 999 - Doctoral Research
Credits: Cr/F.

Nutrition

NUTR 825 - Metabolic Adaptations to Exercise II
Credits: 4.00
This course examines the regulation of cellular metabolism in muscle, liver, adipose and other tissues of the body by enzymes, effectors, and hormones in response to exercise. It focuses on the exercise-induced mechanisms for controlling metabolic pathway flow, techniques for studying metabolism, and up-to-date molecular and cellular exercise physiology research. Prereq: BCHM 658 or KIN 724.

NUTR 840 - Nutrition for Children with Special Needs
Credits: 2.00
Nutritional assessment and care of children with special needs resulting in feeding difficulties requiring medical nutrition therapy. Prereq: NUTR 400.

NUTR 850 - Nutritional Biochemistry
Credits: 4.00
Study of digestion, absorption, transport, and utilization of food nutrients from a biochemical perspective. Emphasis on the role of macro- and micronutrients as substrates and catalysts for metabolic pathways, and the role of these pathways in maintaining human health at the cellular, organ, and whole body levels. Prereq: general biochemistry. (Also offered as ANSC 850.)

NUTR 851 - Nutritional Biochemistry of Micronutrients
Credits: 4.00
Investigation of the biochemical and clinical aspects of micronutrient metabolism. All of the essential vitamins and minerals are explored in depth. Some representative phyto-nutrients and qausi-nutrients are also explored. The nutrients are examined for their molecular, cellular, and biomedical functions and intermediary metabolism, as well as the biochemical and clinical consequences of their deficiency or excess. Prereq: Nutritional biochemistry (NUTR 750/850 or equivalent.) Spring semester only.

NUTR 855 - Treatment of Adult Obesity
Credits: 4.00
Overview of the risk factors associated with obesity; evidence-based recommendations for assessment and treatment of obesity. Counseling skills important to successful weight management and non-diet approaches are also explored. Special fee.

NUTR 870 - Nutrition and Gender Based Health Concerns
Credits: 4.00
Offers a comprehensive review of the health issues facing adult men and women today. Students read and evaluate the current literature and document their reactions to group discussion in reaction papers on the topic. Students also present a topic of interest to the class.

NUTR 873 - Clinical Nutrition
Credits: 4.00
Principles of normal nutrition and physiology applied to clinical problems; altered nutrient requirements in human disease. Prereq: basic nutrition, anatomy and physiology, and biochemistry, or permission. (Fall semester only.)
Co-requisites:

NUTR 880 - Critical Issues in Nutrition
Credits: 4.00
Critical review and analysis of controversial topics in nutrition; emphasis on developing oral and written communications skills and analytical reasoning skills. Prereq: permission. (Spring semester only.)

NUTR 895 - Investigations
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Prereq: permission.

NUTR 898 - Nutrition Research Experience
Credits: 4.00
Students develop a project of interest and identify a mentor within the department to advise them throughout the project. Students prepare a project proposal for review. Final paper and presentation. May be repeated up to a maximum of 4 credits.

NUTR 899 - Master's Thesis
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
Graduate students must enroll for a total of 6 credits for this course. Students may enroll in 1-6 credits per semester. Permission required. Cr/F.

NUTR 900 - Contemporary Topics in Animal, Nutritional, and Biomedical Sciences
Credits: 1.00
An informal forum for graduate students to gain experiences in evaluating the current literature of a contemporary topic. (Also offered as ANSC 900.)  May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. Offered both fall and spring semesters. Cr/F.

NUTR 929 - Dietetics: Principles and Practices
Credits: 4.00
Course provides an orientation to those graduate students enrolled in the dietetic internship program that encompasses community, food service and clinical nutrition topics. Concepts to be explored include, but are not limited to, an orientation to the profession, ethical standards of the American Dietetic Association, counseling theory, basic nutrition assessments, evidence-based medicine, food safety, research, and emotional intelligence. In addition to the didactic instruction over 175 hours of practicum based experiential learning is integrated via hands on dietetics work which includes but is not limited to long term care facilities, camp based food service and health promotion initatives, food service operations and sustainable food planning and production experiences, and research.

NUTR 930 - Dietetics: Foodservice, Community and Research
Credits: 6.00
This course is designed to enhance pre-professional work experiences with continued examination and application of theory and practice in the dietetic profession. Concepts explored include foodservice management topics such as facility and human resources management, translation of nutrition into foods/menus, procurement, distribution and service within delivery systems, and food safety and sanitation. Community nutrition topics include: nutrition screening and assessment, nutrition counseling and education, food secuirty ans sustainability, program development and evaluation as well as an exploration of health promotion and disease prevention theory and application. A group based research project is identified that investigates a dietetics based hypothesis Weekly seminars, assignments and supplemental readings reinforce practicuum experiences. In addition to the didactic instruction between 500-600 hours of practicuum experience is integrated into the course design.Permission required. Special fee.

NUTR 931 - Dietetics: Clinical Theory and Practice
Credits: 6.00
This course is designed to integrate clinical theory and practice in dietetics care. Bi-weekly seminars, weekly on-line assignments and supplemental readings serve to provide a mechanism to examine the nutritional basis of diet and disease relationships and consider appropriate nutritional interventions. Between 500-600 of clinical rotations are planned and provide interns with the opportunity to explore the application of nutritional science principles and practices within inpatient and outpatient environments. Staff, relief, coupled with an in-depth case study presentation of a current patient with multiple nutrition risk factors will serve as the capstone practicuum project. Permission required. Special fee.

NUTR 955 - Topics in Human Obesity
Credits: 4.00
Various topics related to obesity are discussed from year to year. Topics include: neurregulatory and hormonal mechanisms; role of diet, exercise and energy metabolism, fat as an endocrine organ; obesity, immune function and chronic disease.

NUTR 995 - Non-thesis Investigations
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Advanced investigations in a research project, exclusive of thesis project. Elective only after consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. (Offered both fall and spring semesters.)